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For client authentication, my requirement is to use different certificates for different locator URLs on same IP.

For example:

When a client connects to https://a.b.c.d/locatorA, i want to authenticate the client against certificate A, signed by CA X,

And if a client connects to https://a.b.c.d/locatorB, i want to authenticate the client against certificate B, signed by CA Y.

Also any other URL on a.b.c.d, the client authentication is not needed.

To enable client verification on locatorA and locatorB, I am setting SSLVerifyClient to true in locator directive. And by default SSLVerifyClient is set as none.

But the problem i am facing is how to specify to use Certificate A for locatorA and certificate B for locatorB. I tried adding SSLCertificateFile in locator directives for locatorA and locatorB, but apache said configuration error.

Is there a way i can have different certificates for different URLs on same server based on type of URL?

Thanks, Kowsik kowsik.tulabandual@gmail.com

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It is not possible to directly map different certificates to URLs under the same host.

Usually, you are restricted to 1 certificate per IP. If you implemented SNI, you could additionally map different certificates to host names under the same IP. For example, you could map Certificate A to host locatorA.example.com.

If that helps, you could additionally redirect http://a.b.c.d/locatorA and/or https://a.b.c.d/locatorA (secured by a common Certificate X) to https://locatorA.example.com/locatorA (secured by Certificate A).

Note that, some older clients do not support SNI.

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