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How come that

⌽(⍒'Hello')

is

1 2 4 3 5

when

⍋'Hello'

is

1 2 3 4 5

?

I'm new to APL and stumbled on it by accident. I just wonderes why the second l comes before the first.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You are using both the grade up and grade down as monadic primitives.

By definition grade up returns an integer array of indices which specify the sorted order of the expression following it, in ascending order. If any elements are equal (in your example the two letter l's) , they will appear in the result in the same order that they appeared in the input expression.

So, ⍋'Hello' returns 1 2 3 4 5. The two l's are in the same order, i.e., the 3rd character (1st letter l) precedes the 4th character (2nd letter l).

By definition grade down also returns an integer array of indices which specify the sorted order of the expression following it, in descending order. If any elements are equal (in your example the two letter l's) , they will also appear in the result in the same order that they appeared in the expression.

So, ⍒'Hello' returns 5 3 4 2 1. The two l's remain in the same order because they are equal. When you apply rotate the integer array gets reversed to 1 2 4 3 5 as you witnessed.

The outcome you are seeing is precisely what is expected given the way the functions are defined and how they deal with equal values.

If you want to see a more extreme example compare the output for the following two arrays. Create an array with 10 elements each having the same value of 1. 10⍴1 and then try the grade up function and then try the grade down function:

⍋10⍴1

and

⍒10⍴1

They will both yield the same result:

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
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So when the same scalar appears several times in a row, it'll return from low to high, no matter what? –  sjums Feb 17 '12 at 8:50
    
Yes. the functions both require a rule when the same scalar appears (they do not have to be adjacent) and the rule implemented is to trust that the order they were presented in is correct and so it preserves it. Saying it is from low to high isn't really correct. it is from left to right would be better I think. –  Steven Schroeder Feb 17 '12 at 13:54

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