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Does anybody know how to join multiple iterators in Java? The solution I found iterate through one iterator first, and then move on to the next one. However, what I want is when next() gets called, it first returns the first element from the first iterator. Next time when next() gets called, it returns the first element from the second iterator, and so on.

Thanks

share|improve this question
    
Multiple iterators to same collection or each iterator from different collection? – Nambari Feb 8 '12 at 19:30
2  
    
@RobertPeters Yeah looks like a dupe. flyingfromchina, can you post an example of what you want to clarify the question? – daveslab Feb 8 '12 at 19:35
1  
I don't believe this is a dupe, as the linked question doesn't ask for the specific iteration order this question asks for (and its answers fail at the OP's criteria). – Louis Wasserman Feb 8 '12 at 19:39
up vote 10 down vote accepted

Using Guava's AbstractIterator for simplicity:

final List<Iterator<E>> theIterators;
return new AbstractIterator<E>() {
  private Queue<Iterator<E>> queue = new LinkedList<Iterator<E>>(theIterators);
  @Override protected E computeNext() {
    while(!queue.isEmpty()) {
      Iterator<E> topIter = queue.poll();
      if(topIter.hasNext()) {
        E result = topIter.next();
        queue.offer(topIter);
        return result;
      }
    }
    return endOfData();
  }
};

This will give you the desired "interleaved" order, it's smart enough to deal with the collections having different sizes, and it's quite compact. (You may wish to use ArrayDeque in place of LinkedList for speed, assuming you're on Java 6+.)

If you really, really can't tolerate another third-party library, you can more or less do the same thing with some additional work, like so:

return new Iterator<E>() {
  private Queue<Iterator<E>> queue = new LinkedList<Iterator<E>>(theIterators);
  public boolean hasNext() {
    // If this returns true, the head of the queue will have a next element
    while(!queue.isEmpty()) {
      if(queue.peek().hasNext()) {
        return true;
      }
      queue.poll();
    }
    return false;
  }
  public E next() {
    if(!hasNext()) throw new NoSuchElementException();
    Iterator<E> iter = queue.poll();
    E result = iter.next();
    queue.offer(iter);
    return result;
  }
  public void remove() { throw new UnsupportedOperationException(); }
};

For reference, the "all of iter1, all of iter2, etc" behavior can also be obtained using Iterators.concat(Iterator<Iterator>) and its overloads.

share|improve this answer

It sounds like you want an interleaving. Something like this - completely untested...

public class InterleavingIterable<E> implements Iterable<E> {

    private final Iterable<? extends E> first;
    private final Iterable<? extends E> second;

    public InterleavingIterable(Iterable<? extends E> first,
                                Iterable<? extends E> second) {
        this.first = first;
        this.second = second;
    }

    public Iterator<E> iterator() {
        return new InterleavingIterator<E>(first.iterator(),
                                           second.iterator());
    }

    private static class InterleavingIterator<E> implements Iterator<E> {

        private Iterator<? extends E> next;
        private Iterator<? extends E> current;

        private InterleavingIterator(Iterator<? extends E> first,
                                     Iterator<? extends E> second) {
            next = first;
            current = second;
        }

        public boolean hasNext() {
            return next.hasNext() || (current != null && current.hasNext());
        }

        public E next() throws NoSuchElementException {
            if (next.hasNext()) {
                E ret = next.next();
                if (current != null) {
                    Iterator<? extends E> tmp = current;
                    current = next;
                    next = tmp;
                }
                return ret;
            } else {
                // Nothing left in next... check "current"
                if (current == null || !current.hasNext()) {
                    throw new NoSuchElementException();
                }
                next = current;
                current = null;
                return current.next();
            }
        }

        public void remove() {
            throw new UnsupportedOperationException();
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer

The simplest approach is

for(Type1 t1: collection1)
    for(Type2 t2: collection2)

This will work if what you want it to perform a join between collections.

If you want to iterate two collections I would just use two loops or create a collection with both.

for(Type t1: collection1)
   process(t1);

for(Type t2: collection2)
   process(t2);

If you want interleave the Iterators you can use an array.

Iterator[] iters = { iter1, iter2, ... };
boolean finished;
do {
  finished = true;
  for(Iterator it: iters) {
    if (it.hasNext()) {
       Object obj = it.next();
       // process
       finished = false;
    }
  }
} while(!finished);
share|improve this answer
1  
Hmmm I think he effectively wants Coll1.get(0), Coll2.get(0), Coll1.get(1), Coll2.get(1) - ie interleaved, not nested – Bohemian Feb 8 '12 at 19:32
5  
I don't think that will do what's requested, will it? – Jon Skeet Feb 8 '12 at 19:32
    
Wouldn't this run redundantly? For every item in t1, all items in t2?? – noMAD Feb 8 '12 at 19:46
    
In the first case, yes. That's what a table JOIN in a database does when there are no constraints. – Peter Lawrey Feb 9 '12 at 7:48

Edit: Oops, misinterpreted your question. You actually need an interleaving iterator, instead of a compound iterator:

class InterleavingIterator<T> implements Iterator<T> {

    private final Iterator<T> internalIter;

    public InterleavingIterator(final Iterator<T>... iterators) {
        final LinkedList<Iterator<T>> iteratorQueue = new LinkedList<Iterator<T>>();
        for (final Iterator<T> loopIter : iterators) {
            if (loopIter.hasNext()) {
                iteratorQueue.push(loopIter);
            }
        }

        // create the interleaving
        final LinkedList<T> internalList = new LinkedList<T>();
        while (!iteratorQueue.isEmpty()) {
            final Iterator<T> loopIter = iteratorQueue.pop();
            internalList.add(loopIter.next());
            if (loopIter.hasNext()) {
                iteratorQueue.push(loopIter);
            }
        }
        internalIter = internalList.iterator();
    }

    public boolean hasNext() {
        return internalIter.hasNext();
    }

    public T next() {
        return internalIter.next();
    }

    public void remove() {
        throw new UnsupportedOperationException("remove() unsupported");
    }
}

End edit.

You need to use a compound iterator, something like:

import java.util.Collections;
import java.util.Iterator;
import java.util.LinkedList;

public class CompoundIterator<T> implements Iterator<T> {

    private final LinkedList<Iterator<T>> iteratorQueue;
    private Iterator<T> current;

    public CompoundIterator(final Iterator<T>... iterators) {
        this.iteratorQueue = new LinkedList<Iterator<T>>();
        for (final Iterator<T> iterator : iterators) {
            iteratorQueue.push(iterator);
        }
        current = Collections.<T>emptyList().iterator();
    }

    public boolean hasNext() {
        final boolean curHasNext = current.hasNext();
        if (!curHasNext && !iteratorQueue.isEmpty()) {
            current = iteratorQueue.pop();
            return current.hasNext();
        } else {
            return curHasNext;
        }
    }

    public T next() {
        if (current.hasNext()) {
            return current.next();
        }
        if (!iteratorQueue.isEmpty()) {
            current = iteratorQueue.pop();
        }
        return current.next();
    }

    public void remove() {
        throw new UnsupportedOperationException("remove() unsupported");
    }
}
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