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I have several LINQ queries that will churn records (up to a million) based on various filters, and control are modified depending on the values of particular columns on the resulting filtered row items. I would like to implement threading but I am using LINQ to perform the query and the query itself is the source of delay so I believe a progress bar would instantly jump from 0 to 100 % anyway. Is there a way to overcome this?

A specific example is that a Windows Forms ComboBox Items are populated based on distinct values of a user-chosen particular column from another ComboBox. These items are used to dynamically build another linq query, which are used for a custom dynamic charting tool.

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Just fake numbers{ 5%, 13%, 45%... 99%(for two minutes)}, windows does it all the time... –  gdoron Feb 8 '12 at 20:01
    
That is not a valid solution, so I'm happy to see this in the comments section. –  sammarcow Feb 8 '12 at 20:06

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Use Skip and Take to only load a few records at a time. If you get a Count ahead of time, you can advance the progress bar after each query finishes. You will need to do all of this in a background thread to keep the UI responsive so that the progress bar will show the updates.

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Don't forget to marshal your UI updates to the UI thread properly. –  Chris Shain Feb 8 '12 at 20:19
    
This would only seem to work if the db query takes a relatively small piece of the total time. The feedback is showing the processing of results only. –  Henk Holterman Feb 8 '12 at 20:24

I would like to implement threading but I am using LINQ to perform the query and the query itself is the source of delay so I believe a progress bar would instantly jump from 0 to 100 % anyway.

So the main part is the query running on the Db. There is no feedback here, you will have to fake it. You won't be the only one doing that.

A progressbar is not (intended to be) exact instrumentation, it is all about user-pacification.

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+1 for "user pacification" :-) –  Yahia Feb 8 '12 at 20:20

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