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Give a number x, I wonder if there is any regex that matches for x and x+1 and x+2.

Thanks,

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6  
regexp is not the correct tool for this. –  ghoti Feb 8 '12 at 20:35
    
I know, but never underestimate regex! :-) –  Amir Feb 9 '12 at 0:57
    
"Damn! There's another hole in my wall! All that I'm trying to do is put a nail partially in the drywall so that I can hang a small framed picture. Well, time to pick up the sledgehammer and try again in a different spot..." –  Jack Maney Feb 9 '12 at 17:08
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6 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The best approach would probably be to do something like:

my $x = 3;
my $regex = join "|", $x, $x+1, $x+2;

for (0 .. 10) {
    print "$_\n" if /$regex/;
}

But if you want, you can use interpolation directly within the regexp:

my $x = 3;

for (0 .. 10) {
    print "$_\n" if /$x|${\($x+1)}|${\($x+2)}/;
}

Output for both:

3
4
5

I personally think the latter is a lot less readable though.

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local $" = '|'; /@{[$x, $x+1, $x+2]}/ or /${\join '|' => $x, $x+1, $x+2}/ are other permutations of the concept. –  Eric Strom Feb 8 '12 at 22:08
    
Fails for $_ == 30 –  ikegami Feb 8 '12 at 22:57
    
@ikegami: If he's looking for exact integer matches /3|4|5/ starts failing at 13, if that's what you mean? I'd definitely go with one of your approaches in that case. –  flesk Feb 9 '12 at 6:59
    
Yes, that's what I meant. –  ikegami Feb 9 '12 at 8:11
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String contains:

my $pat = join '|', $x, $x+1, $x+2;
$s =~ /(?<![0-9])(?:$pat)(?![0-9])/    # Assumes non-negative integers

Exact match:

my $pat = join '|', $x, $x+1, $x+2;
$y =~ /^(?:$pat)\z/

$y == $x || $y == $x+1 || $y == $x+2   # Most straightfoward

$x <= $y && $y <= $x+2                 # Possibly clearest

Exact match (More exotic):

grep $y == $x + $_, 0..2

$y ~~ [ map $x_+$_, 0..2 ]
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+1, any reason for [0-9] instead of \d? –  Eric Strom Feb 9 '12 at 2:32
2  
@Eric Strom, Because \d matches way more than 0-9. –  ikegami Feb 9 '12 at 3:26
    
Good point, I've got a few old regexes to fix. I was just thinking, it would be useful to have a pragma to make \d and friends only match ascii characters, and then I found the new 5.14 /a flag. –  Eric Strom Feb 9 '12 at 22:53
1  
@Eric Strom, You could specify the flag using the re pragma: use re '/a'; –  ikegami Feb 10 '12 at 2:10
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You could use (??{...}):

use re qw'eval';

/^ (?: $x | (??{ $x+1 }) | (??{ $x+2 }) ) $/x;

I would like to say that it make more sense to use $":

local $" #" # fix highlighting
  = '|';

/^@{[ $x, $x+1, $x+2 ]}$/;

/^@{[ $x .. $x+2 ]}$/;

my @match = ( $x, $x+1, $x+2 );
/^@match$/;
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+1, and if you wrap the first $x in (??{...}) you don't need re eval. –  Eric Strom Feb 9 '12 at 2:38
    
I'd give +1 for (??{}) (although it would be very inefficient in a loop where $x doesn't change), but I can't agree with using $". Too much action at a distance. –  ikegami Feb 9 '12 at 3:30
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I first thought of using index like so:

index( $source, $x + 2 );

But then, for $x=1, it just looks for a '3' anywhere in the string, matching 31, 23. So it appears that you might want to use a regex to make sure that it's an isolated string of digits.

/(?<!\d)${\( $x + 2 )}(?!\d)/
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Given your other variable--let's call it $y--why not just check whether or not $y==$x, $y-$x==1, or $y-$x==2?

As ghoti pointed out in his/her comment, regular expressions aren't the tool for this.

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For X = 10, regex should be \b(?:11|12)\b

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