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Is it possible to tell Unit1 Form1 to create another self ,

Application.CreateForm(TForm1, Form1);

and trough the first form1 to be able to tell the difference between the original form1 components and the second, new form1 components.

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5  
You need to stop using the global variables if you do this. Also, no need at all for Application.CreateForm apart from for the main form. Otherwise use MyLocalFormVar := TForm1.Create(MainForm), say. – David Heffernan Feb 8 '12 at 20:53
3  
Please explain in more detail what you want to do. There should be no reason for instances of same form to behave differently. Btw, it's a good practice to delete the auto generated form variable, and declare it yourself in a more appropriate place. – Daniel Maurić Feb 8 '12 at 20:55
up vote 0 down vote accepted

The simple way to do this without going all object oriented and without resorting to a spaghetti bowl of global variables is to have the form that controls another form hold a reference to the form it needs to control. And it doesn't matter whether it is the same form or another form class. Though in the latter case you will need to add the form's unit to the interface section's uses clause.

TForm1 = class(TForm)
private
  FFormToControl: TForm2; // Class member so initialized to nil by the compiler.
end;

Then somewhere in the code, you will need to instantiate the form that you want to control.

FFormToControl := TForm2.Create(<Owner>);
FFormToControl.Show;

For you can use Application, Self or nil. It depends on who you want the owner to be and that depends on who you want to control the lifetime of FFormToControl. If it will simply exist until the application is closed Application will do fine. If it should be freed when Form1 is freed, use Self or nil. Self will ensure that the VCL's ownership system will take care of freeing. Using nil means that you will have to Free it yourself.

Afterwards you can simply call methods and set properties of the TForm2 class:

FFormToControl.DoSomethingCool;
FFormToControl.EditBackgroundColors := clRed;

If the second form can exist and be closed during the lifetime of a TForm1 instance, then you need to check whether the form has been instantiated before using any of its methods and properties:

if Assigned(FFormToControl) then begin
  FFormToControl.DoSomethingCool;
  FFormToControl.EditBackgroundColors := clRed;
end;

You should also do that when FFormToControl is instantiated somewhere other than TForm1's constructor (or OnCreate) and freed before TForm1's destructor (or OnDestroy) as you can then never be sure whether FFormToControl is instantiated. In this case you are probably better of to use nil as the owner for FFormToControl and you should make sure that TForm1 is notified when FFormToControl is freed. For example by responding to the OnDestroy event and in its handler setting FFormToControl to nil.

FFormToControl := TForm2.Create(<Owner>);
FFormToControl.OnDestroy := HandleForm2Destroy;
FFormToControl.Show;


procedure TForm1.HandleForm2Destroy(Sender: TObject);
begin
  if Sender = FFormToControl then begin
    FFormToControl := nil;
  end;
end;

Note: When you do create and use a form from its own methods, you will have to be careful to avoid an endless loop of creating the next instance.

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Simple way is to define another global variable named Form1Copy: TForm1 and add another Application.CreateForm for Form1Copy in project source.

Better way is to avoid using Application.CreateForm if TForm1 is the only form you have or if it is not the main form and use the following code:

var
  Form1, Form1Copy: TForm1;
...

procedure InitializeMyForms;
begin
  Form1 := TForm1.Create(nil);
  Form1Copy := TForm1.Create(nil);

  ... //Do extra stuff

  Form1.Show;
  Form1Copy.Show;
end;
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look, if you allow the forms to free their memory when they close, you do not need to have a variable at all....

Step #1

procedure TForm1.FormClose(Sender: TObject; var Action: TCloseAction);
begin
  Action := caFree;
end;

Step #2

  TForm1.Create(Application);
   TForm1.Create(Application);
   TForm1.Create(Application);

Step #3 Next, to reference your forms from other areas of the program there are multiple ways. You can use the screen object, or the application.components, if it's MdiChildren, you can use the MdiParents.MdiChildren property... like so.

for i := 0 to Screen.FormCount - 1 do
begin
  if Screen.Forms[i] is TForm1 then
    TForm1(Screen.Forms[i]).MyPublicMethod;
end;
share|improve this answer
    
Why avoid variables if it means having to search for a form every time you want to call a method or set a property on it? I don't use the global form variables either, but that doesn't mean you shouldn't use vars at all. If a form as a dependency on another form (tells it what to do/change) then there is no reason at why that form c/should not hold a reference to that second form. – Marjan Venema Feb 9 '12 at 8:50
    
@Marjan The reason I posted a solution that avoided the variables is because I understood the question to only suggest at least 1 more copy and maybe more. If you know then number of additional form copies you need, then yes, additional variables are sufficient. – GDF Feb 13 '12 at 22:36
    
Ah, yes, that makes sense. I tend to use my own T(Object)List instance for that. Partly just out of habit, partly because I have more control over the contents of the list (I use quite a number of embedded forms). – Marjan Venema Feb 14 '12 at 7:45

The object oriented approach would be to make a Form1Factory and have that Form1Factory create and manage Form1 instances. If you need to send an event to all Form1 instances, for example, or handle what happens when a form closes, if it has to notify the other forms of the same type, that would be a job to hand to your factory object.

You could make a TObjectList<TForm1> so you have a list of just those objects, and that could save you from having to iterate Screen.Forms as the other answer mentions. David H's comment really is key to your answer; You don't need that global variable. Take it right out of Form1.pas, and then keep iterating and testing until you have your solution.

Instead of having a form create another copy of itself, why not have it tell the Form Factory to do that, via a delegate (callback function). THen you can later decide that you want the factory object to create and reuse form objects from a pool instead of always constructing a new one.

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