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I have a basic 'users' table I want to create in MySQL.

I do not want duplicate emails or duplicate usernames appearing in the database.

  • What is the best way of preventing this upon table creation?
  • And what is the difference between the following:

1. UNIQUE (username), UNIQUE (email),

2. UNIQUE KEY (username), UNIQUE KEY (email),

3. CONSTRAINT ucons_login UNIQUE (username, email),

I assume some of these are synonymous, yet I've been reading conflicting information online and was seeking confirmation.

I hope someone can assist.

The SQL:

CREATE TABLE users (
user_id INT UNSIGNED NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
username VARCHAR(30) NOT NULL,
pass CHAR(40) NOT NULL,
first_name VARCHAR(20) NOT NULL,
last_name VARCHAR(40) NOT NULL,
email VARCHAR(60) NOT NULL,
registration_date DATETIME NOT NULL,
user_level TINYINT(1) UNSIGNED NOT NULL DEFAULT 0,
active CHAR(32),
PRIMARY KEY (user_id),
UNIQUE (username),
UNIQUE (email),
INDEX login (email, pass),
INDEX full_name (last_name, first_name)
) ENGINE=INNODB;
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ps: the index for email,pass will probably only make things slower. The unique constraint on email can work as a normal index as well. Selects on email will return at most 1 row so there is no need to also index on pass. –  Erik Ekman Feb 8 '12 at 21:38

2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

1 and 2 are identical - both create two unique indexes, one for each key. #3 only creates one unique index across both keys, so no combination of username and email can be duplicated, but for example, a username could be duplicated as long as a different email was used.

Sounds like you probably want either of the first two. UNIQUE and UNIQUE KEY are equivalent.

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Perfect, cheers for the information! –  leokennedy Feb 8 '12 at 21:31

They are all synonymous as evidenced by syntax documentation:

[CONSTRAINT [symbol]] UNIQUE [INDEX|KEY] [index_name] [index_type] (index_col_name,...) [index_option]

[] in this notation (Wirth's notation) denote optional elements

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1  
The third one is a complex key across multiple fields, as opposed to two distinct keys. –  Ryan P Feb 8 '12 at 21:26
    
Indeed... I didn't notice that in the question. –  Mchl Feb 8 '12 at 21:27
    
Thanks for the link the MySQL create table syntax is starting to make more sense now. –  leokennedy Feb 8 '12 at 21:32
    
KennedyL: more details about this notation here: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wirth_syntax_notation –  Mchl Feb 8 '12 at 21:49

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