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I've got to group multiple strings into one to make a comparison. This grouping should be done exactly like the Java OO paradigm: a string that "describes" the substring. Example:

String one = "hammer";
String two = "screwdriver";
String three = "pliers";

Now let's say you want to "describe" them:

String str = "tool"

All strings above are tools. Now, my code have string one, two, three and change them into "tool". So, for example, string one become tool, the same for string two and string three. How to "categorize" them? Another extended example:

String one = "hammer"
String two = "screwdriver";
String three = "pliers";
String four = "horse";
String five = "cat";
String six = "dog";

public void stringConverter(String str)
{
    if ("string match to an animal")
        str = "animal";
    if ("string match to a tool")
        str = "tool";
}

Maybe it's a stupid thing to implement but right now I don't have any ideas! Thank you!

edit: my group is limited, I know that i have only cat, dog, horse, hammer, etc... edit2: It's difficult to express me! It should be something like:

Group Animal = {cat, dog, horse}
Group Tools = {hammer, screwdriver}

// methods to recognize to wich one of the two groups is categorizable

The Map is a good idea but it has to be filled at every runtime. Isn't there something static like writing them directly into braces? It should be something like enums but never used before!

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I don't know why you would ever want to do something like this, but just add all of the reference Strings into a Set for each category and then search the Sets for the test String. docs.oracle.com/javase/6/docs/api/java/util/Set.html –  smp7d Feb 8 '12 at 21:41
    
Compile time or runtime? (edit: the set of values and associated descriptions -- dynamic or static?) –  alphazero Feb 8 '12 at 21:55
    
The set of values is static, not runtime. @smp7d Maps are useful, but I've got to fill them and should be done one per time. –  Angelo Feb 8 '12 at 22:04
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4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Build a Map mapping strings to their "category."

Map<String, String> category = new HashMap<String, String>();
category.put("hammer", "tool");
category.put("screwdriver", "tool");
category.put("horse", "animal");

and then you just use category.get(str) to get the category.

If they're static, you're probably best served by a Guava ImmutableMap, possibly using its builder syntax.

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It is perfect! Is there a way to fill it in one way, without calling put() everytime? –  Angelo Feb 8 '12 at 21:48
2  
Depends what you mean. Where are you getting the categorizations? There are a couple hacky ways to do it, but your best bet is either a) stick with the one-at-a-time put operations, or possibly use Guava's ImmutableMap.builder(), if you can use third-party libraries. –  Louis Wasserman Feb 8 '12 at 21:51
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I'd start something like this.

public class Category
{
    private final String name;
    private final Set<String> items;

    public Category(String name)
    {
        this.name = name;
        this.items = new HashSet<String>();
    }

    public String getName()
    {
        return name;
    }

    public void add(String... items)
    {
        for (String item : items)
        {
            this.items.add(item);
        }
    }

    public boolean contains(String item)
    {
        return this.items.contains(item);
    }
}

Then,

Category tools = new Category("tool");
tools.add("hammer", "screwdriver", "pliers");

Category animals = new Category("animal");
animals.add("horse", "dog", "cat");

And finally,

// Guava for brevity
List<Category> categories = Lists.newArrayList(tools, animals);

public void stringConverter(String str)
{
    for (Category c : categories)
    {
        if (c.contains(str)) return c.getName();
    }

    return "not found";
}
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I think you didn't understood my question (and maybe it'se my fault, sorry for my worst english). –  Angelo Feb 8 '12 at 21:43
    
Why do you think so? –  Matt Ball Feb 8 '12 at 21:45
1  
It is done in the same way implementing a Map! –  Angelo Feb 8 '12 at 21:50
1  
Is this limited to Strings? This kind of sound like something enums would be good for. –  Brian Feb 8 '12 at 21:56
1  
Enums are compile time. See comment to your OP. Yes, it can be done. –  alphazero Feb 8 '12 at 22:01
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Use Map<String, String> where the keys of the map are your 6 strings, and the value is either "animal" or "tool". Use map.get(str) to get the type of the string.

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There are many ways to skin this cat (npi;) -- here is one approach. Annotations are another way to go.(e.g. Category is an annotation type with target type of field, etc.) Obviously the comparison mechanism isn't done below but that is trivial.

public enum Category {
    animal, tool
}
public interface Categorized {
    Category getCategory();
}
public enum FarmAnimals implements Categorized {
    dog, cat, horse, rabbit;
    public Category getCategory() {
        return Category.animal;
    }
}
public enum GarageTools implements Categorized {
    screwdriver, drill, wrench;
    public Category getCategory() {
        return Category.tool;
    }
}

[edit: naturally, your enums can be of form dog ("Dog"), etc. if you need embedded spaces, etc.]

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