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I would like to

Monitor.Enter(this.StaticLock);
try
{
    // Do something ...

    ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem(state =>
    {
        try
        {
             // Do something else...

        }
        finally
        {
            Monitor.Exit(this.StaticLock);
        }
    });
}
catch (Exception)
{
    Monitor.Exit(this.StaticLock);
    throw;
}

But it doesn't work since the it can't Monitor.Exit on an object that wasn't Monitor.Enter in the current thread. How to do that? Should I use interthread communication?

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8  
You are probably doing something wrong. What is the use case for this? –  Chris Shain Feb 8 '12 at 21:37
    
why don't you put the Monitor.Enter inside the work item ? –  Yahia Feb 8 '12 at 21:39
3  
Is there a reason you can't lock the object inside of the queueUserWorkItem delegate? (You can lock and then unlock the item for the /*do something*/ that happens before queueing the item if you need to.) –  Servy Feb 8 '12 at 21:40
    
catch block below will only raise if ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem raises an exception, not the code inside.... –  Jesus Salas Feb 8 '12 at 22:26
    
catch block will only raise if QueueUserWorkItem raise an exception, you have a design problem you should lock in the work item as said by @yahia, –  Jesus Salas Feb 8 '12 at 22:27

6 Answers 6

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Semaphores allow you to lock them in one thread and unlock them in another.

But this kind of behavior is very suspicious to me... What exactly are you trying to accomplish? This should almost never be done in practice.

static readonly Semaphore semaphore = new Semaphore(1, 1);

void Method1()
{
    semaphore.WaitOne();
    try
    {
        // Do something ...

        new Thread(() =>
        {
            try
            {
                // Do something else...

            }
            finally
            {
                semaphore.Release();
            }
        }).Start();
    }
    catch (Exception)
    {
        semaphore.Release();
        throw;
    }
}
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I thought of using SemaphoreSlim but it is designed for short wait periods –  Jader Dias Feb 9 '12 at 12:06

How to transfer locks between threads?

You enter the monitor on the initial thread, say thread Alpha. Any other threads that try to enter the monitor will block until the monitor is available.

If you then want to transfer the lock to another thread, say thread Bravo, while still being able to resume thread Alpha with ownership of the monitor when Bravo is done, then you put Alpha in a wait state on the monitor. If thread Bravo is blocked on the monitor then it wakes up and enters the monitor. When it is done it pulses the monitor, which abandons Bravo's ownership of the monitor and transfers ownership back to Alpha, which wakes up and keeps on running with its ownership of the monitor.

If that is totally not clear to you then (1) you shouldn't be trying to do this in the first place; this is super dangerous if you get it wrong, and (2) you should read this:

http://www.codeproject.com/Articles/28785/Thread-synchronization-Wait-and-Pulse-demystified

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You can use Mutexes for this. They are like locks but with a little more features. They are also more expensive.

As you surely already know, you are in dangerous territory here. Passing locks across threads is dangerous...

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One alternative is to use a WaitHandle

var waitHandle = new AutoResetEvent(initialState: false);
ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem(state =>
{
    lock(this.staticLock)
    {
        try
        {
            // Do something ...

        }
        finally
        {
            waitHandle.Set();
        }

        // Do something else...

    }
}

waitHandle.WaitOne();
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If Eric Lipert's answer suited me I would implement:

lock(this.StaticLock)
{
    ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem(state =>
    {
        lock(this.StaticLock)
        {
             // Do something ...

             Monitor.Pulse(this.StaticLock);
             // Do something else...

        }
    });
    Monitor.Wait(this.StaticLock);
}

Unfortunately this solution doesn't prevent another thread from locking this.StaticLock between the Monitor.Wait and the queued thread lock

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Yes use mutexes. There is thing called "lock" and lock allows only on thread to enter the same time inside that lock-ed code.

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This is a quite complex topic. You phoned in a not very useful response that I hesitate to call an answer. –  Andrew Barber Feb 8 '12 at 22:42

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