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This might be a bad idea but I saw this design and want to evaluate: I have one view created by joining two tables (a product view based on product and productDetail table).

    SELECT
    tP.ProductId,
    tP.ProductType,
    tP.Description
    tPD.Statement,
    tPD.Condition,
FROM
    tbl_Product AS tP
    INNER JOIN tbl_ProductDetail AS tPD
        ON tP.ProductId = tPD.ProductId

Now, I have a new product type which need a new field(e.g ExpirationDate) in the detail table. One argument is that since this only apply to specific product type, we create a new table called tbl_FoodProductDetial (new table will have Statement, Condition and ExpirationDate). Intuitively, I think including this field in tbl_ProductDetail is better so we only need to add the extra field in view and not worry about any new changes. But argument against this is adding a field (ExpirationDate) to a general product detail table is not appropriate. Any suggestions? If you prefer the third table, how to join this three table (one is kind of sub table of another)?

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I think adding expirationDate to tbl_ProductDetail is fine. Even if only some products have an expiration date, the field is still relevant to all products since it tells you that they don't expire. –  Michael Fredrickson Feb 8 '12 at 22:50
    
@MichaelFredrickson, very valid point! –  Icerman Feb 8 '12 at 22:54
    
The joining would be easy: LEFT JOIN tbl_FoodProductDetial tFPD ON tFPD.ProductId = tP.ProductId –  ypercube Feb 8 '12 at 23:09

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You need to trade off architectural purity with more work. Will it cause you maintenance problems in the future to just stick the new field to the same table? If not, go with the approach that is less word (just stick it in!). If you think the extra field will make the application much less clear to understand and improve, introduce a third table.

In this case I think you can safely reuse the existing table. A third table will make much more work than I think is appropriate.

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I agree with Michael and usr. Also, it sounds like the argument for a third table is using object oriented derivation logic : the Food class derives from the Product class and they are attempting to align the database with their classes. That kind of thinking will wind up with so many tables it will be next to impossible to maintain.

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There is name for having one table for almost every attribute: 6NF –  ypercube Feb 8 '12 at 23:13

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