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I have a method which should consider a collection of instances of a class and find the first positive number not present as an attribute in those instances.

Here is my situation: I have a class called GestorePersonale (an employee manager class) which administers a List of instances of Dipendente (an employee class). Each Dipendente has an ID which has to be unique among all of the other instances of Dipendente present in the List's.

When creating a new Dipendente I have to find an unique ID to assign to it.
For this task, I first find out the highest ID (Matricola) among all of the instances in the list and then cycle through all of the numbers from 0 to that ID to try to find a gap ID to use for the new Dipendente. If all else fails, I'll just assign an ID corresponding to max + 1.

Here is the method MatricolaMax() which is in charge of returning the highest ID between those of all of the instances in the List (I'm posting this code just for clarity, it is not the part the question focuses on, even though any suggestion for performance improvement would be highly appreciated here as well):

private uint MatricolaMax ()
{
    // Looking for the highest ID
    return dipendenti.OrderByDescending( dipendente => dipendente.Matricola ).First().Matricola;
}

and here is the method this question's title refers to:

private uint MatricolaLibera ()
{
    var max = MatricolaMax();
    for ( uint i = 0; i < max; i++ )
    {
        var conto = dipendenti.Where( dipendente => dipendente.Matricola == i ).Count();

        if ( conto == 0 )
            return i;
    }
    return max + 1;
}

As you can see in the code above, to find a gap ID I'm using a Where query to check whether a Dipendente instance with a Matricola (ID) corresponding to i exists.

If I were to do this using a for loop instead of the query, this would be the code I'd write:

private uint MatricolaLibera ()
{
    var max = MatricolaMax();
    bool found;
    for ( uint i = 0; i < max; i++ )
    {
        found = false;
        for( int j = 0; j < dipendenti.Count; j++)
            if ( dipendenti[j].Matricola == i )
            {
                found = true;
                break;
            }

        if ( !found )
            return i;
    }
    return max + 1;
}

basically adding an inner for loop and a bool check to see if a free ID was found.


My question to you is the following:

Which of the two methods presented (query vs. inner for loop) performs the best? Does an even better solution exist?

share|improve this question
12  
Why on earth are you asking us? You've written it both ways. Run the code and see which one is faster and then you'll know the answer! If you have two horses and you want to know which one runs faster, do you ask strangers on the internet who have never even seen the horses, or do you run the horses? – Eric Lippert Feb 8 '12 at 22:58
1  
Answer could depend on collection sizes. I think it will much better if you will just measure how they work. I will vote that second will be faster because it does not create new objects. But really I do not think that difference will be any noticable. – Mike Chaliy Feb 8 '12 at 22:58
    
@EricLippert hahaha, here's what lack of proper sleep can bring to :P. Hang on, I'll go try this and post results. – Gabriele Cirulli Feb 8 '12 at 23:09
    
Count() alone on IEnmerable is on O(n) operation – Magnus Feb 8 '12 at 23:26
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Eric Lippert has the best answer to your main question, but to your "is there a better way question", here is an answer.

You can use an integer to hold the highest option found, as well as a bool array to hold used values. Assuming you have a good upper bound, you can do this with a single array, if you do not you will need to handle growing the array as needed. Then you can simply enumerate your list, marking used values and updating max if needed. If you have no idea an upper bound or it can be arbitrarily high, then use a different algorithm.

However at this point you are looking at some very non-trivial code (that can perform horribly if an upper bound is not known), so if your existing solutions work, use them.

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Of course as Eric says, you should run the code to answer your question of which performs better. (But it should be run on sizes similar to what you will see in real use, not just small sizes.)

Some things I'll suggest:

Your MatricolaMax method is sorting the list to find the highest value. Sorting is at minimum O(n*logn), whereas simply enumerating the list and comparing the values would be O(n).

Both MatricolaLibra functions are going through the entire collection for each possible value. This is O(n*m). I would suggest going through the list once, putting each key in a dictionary, then enumerate the dictionary to find the first one that doesn't exist. This should be much faster.

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