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If I have a piece of code that looks like this:

- (void)testSomething
{
  __weak NSString *str = [[NSString alloc] initWithFormat:@"%@", [NSDate date]];
  NSLog(@"%@", str);
}

the output will be (null) because there are no strong references to str and it will be immediately released after I allocate it. This makes sense and is spelled out in the Transitioning to ARC guide.

If my code looks like this:

- (void)testSomething
{
  __weak NSString *str = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"%@", [NSDate date]];
  NSLog(@"%@", str);
}

then it correctly prints out the current date. Obviously you would expect it to work in a non-ARC world, since str would be autoreleased and therefore valid until this method exits. However, in ARC-enabled code people generally consider the two forms (stringWithFormat & alloc/initWithFormat) to be equivalent.

So my question is whether code like the second example is guaranteed to work under ARC. That is, if I have a weak reference to an object that I get via what we would normally consider an autoreleasing convenience constructor, is it guaranteed to be safe to use that reference in the same scope I normally would have without ARC (i.e. until the method exits)?

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1  
Interesting question, but I suspect the best answer is "you shouldn't care". –  Kevin Ballard Feb 8 '12 at 22:57
    
You are probably right. This question is really just to make sure I understand the answers to some other questions I have seen. –  UIAdam Feb 8 '12 at 23:32
    
UIAdam, I'm with Kevin on this one. Let the compiler worry about memory allocation. __weak is a somewhat ineffective method to control instance lifetimes. If you explicitly want to control the lifetime of the item, then use the +alloc form being assigned to a strong reference. Then nil that reference upon exit. Nil-ling out a reference is the new -release. IMO, __weak is used to break retain cycles, nothing more. Andrew P.S. With ARC, we should all just "lay back and think of England." –  adonoho Feb 9 '12 at 14:42
    
Yes, I agree...The real code that I had in mind when asking this question did in fact involve breaking a retain cycle. –  UIAdam Feb 9 '12 at 15:44

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The conventions of autoreleasing and allocing still apply in the world of ARC. The only difference is that ARC will insert extra retain/release calls to make it much harder to leak objects or access a dealloced object.

In this code:

__weak NSString *str = [[NSString alloc] initWithFormat:@"%@", [NSDate date]];

The only place the object is retained (or equivalent) is the alloc. ARC will automatically insert a release command, causing it to be immediately dealloced.

Meanwhile, in this code:

 __weak NSString *str = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"%@", [NSDate date]];

By convention, the return value of a convenience constructor like this must be an autoreleased object*. That means the current autoreleasepool has retained the object and will not release it until the pool is drained. You are therefore all but guaranteed that this object will exist for at least the duration of your method - although you probably shouldn't rely on this behaviour.

(* or retained in some other way)

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1  
Note however that if you have NSString *str = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"%@", [NSDate date]]; __weak NSString *weakStr = str; and if str is no longer referenced after the assignment to weakStr (and therefore is out of scope), then weakStr may end up nil, depending on whether +stringWithFormat: itself was compiled under ARC. –  Kevin Ballard Feb 9 '12 at 0:45
    
In ARC, the return value of a convenience constructor is not guaranteed to end up in the autorelease pool. See my answer for details and an example. –  Tammo Freese Nov 17 '12 at 23:38

The lifetime of a local weak variable is not guaranteed at all. If the object that the variable points to is deallocated, the weak variable will point to nil afterwards.

If you have a weak reference to an object that you got via a method that does not return a retained object, it is not safe to assume that this object lives until the method exits. If you want to make sure that the object survives, use a strong reference.

Here is an example that shows that a non-retaining method's return value is not guaranteed to end up in the autorelease pool:

  • Create a new iOS project (Single View App using ARC and Storyboards)
  • Add this method to the AppDelegate.m:

    + (id)anObject
    {
        return [[NSObject alloc] init];
    }
    
  • Replace -application:didFinishLaunchingWithOptions::

    - (BOOL)application:(UIApplication *)application didFinishLaunchingWithOptions:(NSDictionary *)launchOptions
    {
        __weak id x = [AppDelegate anObject];
        NSLog(@"%@", x);
        return YES;
    }
    
  • Important: Now set the Optimization level for Debug to -Os.

In this example, +[AppDelegate anObject] acts like a convenience constructor, but you will see (null) logged if you execute it on a device with -Os optimization. The reason for that is a nifty ARC optimization that prevents the overhead of adding the object to the autorelease pool.

You may have noticed that I switched to not using a library method like +[NSString stringWithFormat:]. These seem to always put objects in the autorelease pool, that may be for compatibility reasons.

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Of course the object is not going to automatically end up in an autorelease pool without autorelease ever being called on it. That has never been the case. But in real code where you have a convenience constructor that you want/need to be consistent with existing conventions (i.e. that the returned object is autoreleased), then you would call autorelease on it and therefore it would behave as an autoreleased object regardless of whether you are using ARC or not. –  UIAdam Nov 26 '12 at 3:26
    
Actually, for the method -anObject above, ARC automatically inserts a call to objc_autoreleaseReturnValue or objc_returnAutoreleaseReturnValue. The object will end up in the autorelease pool if -anObject is called from non-ARC code, or even in ARC unless you set the optimization level -Os. –  Tammo Freese Nov 26 '12 at 12:02
    
And since ARC, the convention is not to add the object to the autorelease pool, but it is tried to optimize so that adding to the autorelease pool is not necessary. Adding to the autorelease pool is described as "worst case". See clang.llvm.org/docs/… . So your second example is not guaranteed under ARC – it may work now, but it is not guaranteed. –  Tammo Freese Nov 26 '12 at 13:36

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