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Is somebody aware of a natural program or algorithm that has a non-monotone worst-case behavior?

By non-monotone worst-case behavior I mean that there is a natural number n such that the worst-case runtime for inputs of size n+1 is less than the worst-case runtime for inputs of size n.

Of course, it is easy to construct a program with this behavior. It might even be the case that this happens for small n (like n = 1) in natural programs. But I'm interested in a useful algorithm that is non-monotone for large n.

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Define "useful". An algorithm can be useful even if it isn't as efficient as possible. Also, are you ruling out contrived algorithms? If what you're looking for are common, well-known, famous algorithms with this property, or whether problems exist whose optimal algorithm has this property, I suggest you be explicit about it. Otherwise, "usefulness" is subjective. –  Patrick87 Feb 8 '12 at 23:27
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Is somebody aware of a natural program or algorithm that has a non-monotone worst-case behavior?

Please define "natural program or algorithm". The concept "algorithm" has a definition I'm aware of, and there are certainly algorithms (as you correctly admit) which have non-monotone worst-case runtime complexity. Is a program "natural" if it does no unecessary work or has minimal runtime complexity for the class of problem it solves? In that case, would you argue that BubbleSort isn't an algorithm? More importantly, I can define a problem the most efficient solution to which has non-monotone worst-case behavior. Would such a problem be "unnatural"? What is your definition of a "natural problem"?

Of course, it is easy to construct a program with this behavior.

Then what's the real question? Until you commit to a definition of natural/useful algorithms and problems, your question has no answer. Are you interested only in pre-existing algorithms which people already use in the real world? If so, you should state that, and the problem becomes one of searching the literature. Frankly, I cannot imagine a reasonable definition of "natural, useful algorithm" which would preclude many examples of algorithms with non-monotone runtime complexity...

But I'm interested in a useful algorithm that is non-monotone for large n.

Please define "useful algorithm". The concept "algorithm" has a definition I'm aware of, and there are certainly algorithms (as you correctly admit) which have non-monotone worst-case runtime complexity. Is an algorithm "useful" if it correctly solves some problem? I can easily define a problem which can be solved by an algorithm with non-monotone runtime complexity.

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Think about a binary search.

When implementing binary search you need to think about the case where the array segment which you're splitting is of odd length. At that point you have 2 choices: 1. Round up/down 2. Check both indexes and make a decision before continuing.

If you choose the first case (lets assume you round down). For odd length arrays where the number you're searching for is the one passed the middle point, you'll have an extra iteration to make.
If that odd array was added one more element it would have saved you that extra iteration.

If you went for the second case, then most executions of the algorithm with more odd iterations then even would require more comparisons then if it was used with an extra element.

Note that all this is very implementation dependent, and so there can't be a real answer without a real algorithm (and moreover a real implementation).

Also all this is based on the assuming you're talking about actual run-time diff and not asymptotic diff. If that's not the case, then the answer would be "no". There is no algorithms with non-monotonic worst case asymptotic running time. That would defy the concept of "worst case".

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