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I have an application that uses Hibernate/JPA, with Spring and Jersey. In my application context I set the data source, define an entity manager factory, set the transaction manager with that entity manger factory, and have various service methods annotated with the transactional annotation, so I also have the tx:annotation-driven definition to wire in my transaction manager where needed. This setup works great, I've been able to read and right just fine. I would like to move to a DB setup where I have a Master with multiple slaves (MySQL). So I want all the methods annotated with transactional to use a data source pointing to the master db server, and all others to use a connection pool of the slaves.

I've tried creating two different datasources, with two different entity manager factories, and two different persistent units - ugly to say the least. I tried a MySQL Proxy but we had more problems with that then we need. The connection pooling is handled in the servlet container already. Could I implement something in Tomcat that reads the transaction and directs it to the right database server, or is there a way I could get all those methods annotated with the transactional annotation to use a particular datasource?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Here's what I ended up doing and it worked quite well. The entity manager can only have one bean to use as the data source. So what I had to do was to create a bean that routed between the two where necessary. That one ben is the one I used for the JPA entity manager.

I setup two different data sources in tomcat. In the server.xml I created two resources (data sources).

<Resource name="readConnection" auth="Container" type="javax.sql.DataSource"
          username="readuser" password="readpass"
          url="jdbc:mysql://readipaddress:3306/readdbname"
          driverClassName="com.mysql.jdbc.Driver"
          initialSize="5" maxWait="5000"
          maxActive="120" maxIdle="5"
          validationQuery="select 1"
          poolPreparedStatements="true"
          removeAbandoned="true" />
<Resource name="writeConnection" auth="Container" type="javax.sql.DataSource"
          username="writeuser" password="writepass"
          url="jdbc:mysql://writeipaddress:3306/writedbname"
          driverClassName="com.mysql.jdbc.Driver"
          initialSize="5" maxWait="5000"
          maxActive="120" maxIdle="5"
          validationQuery="select 1"
          poolPreparedStatements="true"
          removeAbandoned="true" />

You could have the database tables on the same server, in which case the ip addresses or domain would be the same, just different dbs - you get the jist.

I then added a resource link in the context.xml file in tomcat that referenced these to resources.

<ResourceLink name="readConnection" global="readConnection" type="javax.sql.DataSource"/>
<ResourceLink name="writeConnection" global="writeConnection" type="javax.sql.DataSource"/>

These resource links are what spring reads in the application context.

In the application context I added a bean definition for each resource link and added one additional bean definition that referenced a Datasource Router bean I created that takes in a map (enum) of the two previously created beans (bean definition).

<!--
Data sources representing master (write) and slaves (read).
-->
<bean id="readDataSource" class="org.springframework.jndi.JndiObjectFactoryBean">
    <property name="jndiName" value="readConnection" /> 
    <property name="resourceRef" value="true" />
    <property name="lookupOnStartup" value="true" />
    <property name="cache" value="true" />
    <property name="proxyInterface" value="javax.sql.DataSource" />  
</bean>

<bean id="writeDataSource" class="org.springframework.jndi.JndiObjectFactoryBean">
    <property name="jndiName" value="writeConnection" />
    <property name="resourceRef" value="true" />
    <property name="lookupOnStartup" value="true" />
    <property name="cache" value="true" />
    <property name="proxyInterface" value="javax.sql.DataSource" />
</bean>

<!--
Provider of available (master and slave) data sources.
-->
<bean id="dataSource" class="com.myapp.dao.DatasourceRouter">
    <property name="targetDataSources">
      <map key-type="com.myapp.api.util.AvailableDataSources">
         <entry key="READ" value-ref="readDataSource"/>
         <entry key="WRITE" value-ref="writeDataSource"/>
      </map>
   </property>
   <property name="defaultTargetDataSource" ref="writeDataSource"/>
</bean>

The entity manager bean definition then referenced the dataSource bean.

<bean id="entityManagerFactory" class="org.springframework.orm.jpa.LocalContainerEntityManagerFactoryBean">
    <property name="dataSource" ref="dataSource" />
    <property name="persistenceUnitName" value="${jpa.persistenceUnitName}" />
    <property name="jpaVendorAdapter"> 
        <bean class="org.springframework.orm.jpa.vendor.HibernateJpaVendorAdapter"> 
            <property name="databasePlatform" value="${jpa.dialect}"/>
            <property name="showSql" value="${jpa.showSQL}" />
        </bean>
    </property>
</bean>

I defined some properties in a properties file, but you can replace the ${} values with your own specific values. So now I have one bean that uses two other beans that represent my two data sources. The one bean is the one I use for JPA. It's oblivious of any routing happening.

So now the routing bean.

public class DatasourceRouter extends AbstractRoutingDataSource{

    @Override
    public Logger getParentLogger() throws SQLFeatureNotSupportedException{
    // TODO Auto-generated method stub
    return null;
    }

    @Override
    protected Object determineCurrentLookupKey(){
    return DatasourceProvider.getDatasource();
    }

}

The overridden method is called by the entity manager to determine the data source basically. The DatasourceProvider has a thread local (thread safe) property with a getter and setter method as well as the clear data source method for clean up.

public class DatasourceProvider{
    private static final ThreadLocal<AvailableDataSources> datasourceHolder = new ThreadLocal<AvailableDataSources>();

    public static void setDatasource(final AvailableDataSources customerType){
    datasourceHolder.set(customerType);
    }

    public static AvailableDataSources getDatasource(){
    return (AvailableDataSources) datasourceHolder.get();
    }

    public static void clearDatasource(){
    datasourceHolder.remove();
    }

}

I have a generic DAO implementation with methods I use to handle various routine JPA calls (getReference, persist, createNamedQUery & getResultList, etc.). Before it makes the call to the entityManager to do whatever it needs to do I set the DatasourceProvider's datasource to the read or write. The method can handle that value being passed in as well to make it a little more dynamic. Here is an example method.

@Override
public List<T> findByNamedQuery(final String queryName, final Map<String, Object> properties, final int... rowStartIdxAndCount)
{
DatasourceProvider.setDatasource(AvailableDataSources.READ);
final TypedQuery<T> query = entityManager.createNamedQuery(queryName, persistentClass);
if (!properties.isEmpty())
{
    bindNamedQueryParameters(query, properties);
}
appyRowLimits(query, rowStartIdxAndCount);

return query.getResultList();
}

The AvailableDataSources is an enum with READ or WRITE, which references the appropriate data source. You can see that in the map defined in my bean on the application context.

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Oh, and you need to make sure the MySQL JAR is in Tomcat, otherwise the data sources (resource) won't work. –  Elrond Feb 21 '12 at 17:23

I have the same kind of need : route the connection between a readonly and writeonly database using a classical MASTER / SLAVE to scale reads.

I end up with a lean solution, using the AbstractRoutingDataSource base class from spring. It allows you to inject a datasource that routes to several datasources based on some conditions that you write.

<bean id="commentsDataSource" class="com.nextep.proto.spring.ReadWriteDataSourceRouter">
    <property name="targetDataSources">
        <map key-type="java.lang.String">
            <entry key="READ" value="java:comp/env/jdbc/readdb"/>
            <entry key="WRITE" value="java:comp/env/jdbc/writedb"/>
        </map>
    </property>
    <property name="defaultTargetDataSource" value="java:comp/env/jdbc/readdb"/>
</bean>

And my router simply looks like the following :

public class ReadWriteDataSourceRouter extends AbstractRoutingDataSource {

@Override
protected Object determineCurrentLookupKey() {
    return TransactionSynchronizationManager.isCurrentTransactionReadOnly() ? "READ"
            : "WRITE";
}
}

I find this quite elegant, but the problem here is that Spring seems to set the transaction to readonly after injecting the datasource, so it does not work. My simple test is to check the result of TransactionSynchronizationManager.isCurrentTransactionReadOnly() in my readonly methods (it is true), and in the determineCurrentLookupKey() method where it is false on the same call.

If you got ideas... Anyway you could base the test on anything else other than TransactionSynchronizationManager and this will work fine.

Hope this helps, Christophe

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<bean id="entityManagerFactory" 
    class="org.springframework.orm.jpa.LocalContainerEntityManagerFactoryBean">
    <property name="persistenceUnitName" value="filerp-pcflows" />
    <property name="dataSource" ref="pooledDS" />
    <property name="persistenceXmlLocation" value="classpath:powercenterCPCPersistence.xml" />
    <property name="jpaVendorAdapter">
        <bean class="org.springframework.orm.jpa.vendor.HibernateJpaVendorAdapter">
            <property name="showSql" value="true" />
            <!--<property name="formatSql" value="true" />
            --><property name="generateDdl" value="false" />
            <property name="database" value="DB2" />
        </bean>
    </property>
</bean>

-->

<bean id="pool" autowire-candidate="false" class="org.apache.commons.pool.impl.GenericObjectPool" destroy-method="close">
    <property name="minEvictableIdleTimeMillis" value="300000"/>
    <property name="timeBetweenEvictionRunsMillis" value="60000"/>
    <property name="maxIdle" value="2"/>
    <property name="minIdle" value="0"/>
    <property name="maxActive" value="8"/>
    <property name="testOnBorrow" value="true"/>
</bean>

<bean id="dsConnectionFactory" class="org.apache.commons.dbcp.DataSourceConnectionFactory">
    <constructor-arg><ref bean="dataSource" /></constructor-arg>
</bean> 
<bean id="poolableConnectionFactory" class="org.apache.commons.dbcp.PoolableConnectionFactory">
    <constructor-arg index="0"><ref bean="dsConnectionFactory" /></constructor-arg>
    <constructor-arg index="1"><ref bean="pool" /></constructor-arg>
    <constructor-arg index="2"><null /></constructor-arg>
    <constructor-arg index="3"><value>select 1 from ${cnx.db2.database.creator}.TPROFILE</value></constructor-arg>
    <constructor-arg index="4"><value>false</value></constructor-arg>
    <constructor-arg index="5"><value>true</value></constructor-arg>
</bean>

<bean id="pooledDS" class="org.apache.commons.dbcp.PoolingDataSource"
    depends-on="poolableConnectionFactory">
    <constructor-arg>
        <ref bean="pool" />
    </constructor-arg>
</bean> 
<import resource="powercenterCPCBeans.xml"/>

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