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I appreciate the attempts to redefine the problem but the structure in question is non negotiable. I'm working with a code base created in 2004 in .NET 1.1 before generics and a lot of other nice features. I cannot break the existing model - only enhance it (hence the conversion of C to C - in totality its actually C : C where C is maintained only to preserve existing inheritance dependencies.

Our 8 year old data layer is a poor man's ORM - it encapsulates Entity functionality (ie: the table fields) and data functionality (connecting and pulling data) in one class. Abstract Generic C and abstract B are generated by a utility app we have used since 2004. That's why B is abstract - so developers are forced to think about the real instantiation of B as type A. (Which was not fully successful, admittedly)

There are over 100 tables in this model, and so over 100 "A" classes in our projects. I cannot adopt any change that will require every single A class to be manually updated. Any changes I make must be done in a generated fashion - and ideally as low down the inheritance root as possible.

The existing select methods return data sets, not themselves. If I am to improve them at all it is only to make them use data readers and return instances of and lists of themselves.

SO thank you to those who've replied so far, but what would actually help me here is an answer to the problem presented, not attempts to redefine the problem to suit what would be ideal in a new app.


Original content:

I have a base abstract generic class C

public abstract class C<T>

from it is derived an abstract class B

public abstract class B : C<B>

And finally A instantiates B

public class A : B

B has methods which return a list of B, that needs to be able to invoke an instance of C to populate the list. I want the method to instance this 2nd generation descendent to reside in C.

public abstract class C<T>
{
    protected abstract PopulateList(List<T> theList, SqlDataReader dr);
    protected TI GetNew<TI>() where TI:T, new() {return new TI();}
}

SO far so good, but now in B I need the PopulateList method to be able to instance new A objects to fill them from a datareader that provides data common to B

public abstract class B : C<B>
{
    public int MyInt {get;set;}

    protected override void PopulateList(List<B> DistributionList, SqlDataReader dr)
    {
        while (dr.Read())
        {
            Distribution newOne = GetNew<B>();

            newOne.MyInt = (Int32)dr["MyInt"];
            DistributionList.Add(newOne);
        }
    }
}

So do I need to make B generic as well? B<T> : C<T> where T:B and reproduce populate list in the same manner as GetOne()? Or is there some way I can force PopulateList to invoke new instances of the current type derived from B without adding a new layer of generics?

Not that a new layer of generics is bad per se- just not preferred in this instance

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2  
maybe my world is too simplistic but why do you need this complicated class inheritance chain? –  BrokenGlass Feb 8 '12 at 23:37
    
Shouldn't Distribution newOne = GetNew<T>(); be Distribution newOne = GetOne<T>(); in your definition of B? Also if you have the type there what's the appeal of your C<T>.GetOne implementation? –  M.Babcock Feb 9 '12 at 0:06
    
Inheritance should only be used if you have an 'Is-A' relationship. I can't see that B is-a C<T> if there is a List<B> implemented in C<T>. Maybe you should consider Composition so that C<T> 'Has-A' List<B> etc. –  Davin Tryon Feb 9 '12 at 0:23
    
@M.Babcock yes, my bad, I got my pseudofunction names confused. –  The Evil Greebo Feb 9 '12 at 0:32
1  
Wait, a specific DbInteraction class fills a list by (derived) instances of itself based on a data from DB? That doesn't make any sense to me. –  svick Feb 9 '12 at 1:22

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can achieve this without more generics if you're willing to make this change to GetNew() in class C<T>:

protected abstract T GetNew();

In B.PopulateList:

B newOne = GetNew();

And in class A:

protected override B GetNew()
{
    return new A();
}

UPDATE: If it isn't practical to make any changes to class A, then you can instead define GetNew() in C<T> as follows:

protected T GetNew()
{
    return (T)Activator.CreateInstance(this.GetType());
}

Inelegant, yes, but it gets the job done.

share|improve this answer
    
I actually started with that approach, but as I just updated in the original question - there are over a hundred "A" classes. I could do this in each of them - but for obvious reasons, I'd much prefer not to. –  The Evil Greebo Feb 9 '12 at 1:22
    
@TheEvilGreebo I updated my answer based on your comment. –  Michael Liu Feb 9 '12 at 2:55
    
Hmm. Yes, inelegant, but the entire project is inelegant. Thanks - I'll try this in the AM. –  The Evil Greebo Feb 9 '12 at 3:03
    
Success. I don't like it, but I don't like any of it. Like doesn't enter into it - I have to get the job done w/in the given specs. –  The Evil Greebo Feb 9 '12 at 15:06

I think you would be better served by doing something like the following:

//Could be an abstract, but an interface is better here
public interface ICanRead
{
    void ReadOne(IDataReader dr);
}

public class B : ICanRead
{
    public int MyInt {get;set;}

    //The interface implementation can be private to 'hide' it from the public
    void ICanRead.ReadOne(IDataReader dr)
    {
        Read(dr);
    }

    protected virtual void Read(IDataReader dr)
    {
        MyInt = (Int32)dr["MyInt"];
    }
}

public class A : B
{
    public int MyOtherInt {get;set;}

    protected override void Read(IDataReader dr)
    {
        base.Read(dr);
        MyOtherInt = (Int32)dr["MyOtherInt"];
    }
}

Now you can use some other class to contain the code for reading a list. Essentially you are kinda mixing the concepts here, making the object do things that a container should be doing. Of course you can always add the ReadList/PopulateList type thing to an extension method of ICanRead for convenience, but it's silly to create a class of type "A" just so you can create a list of new ones.

As an additional concern I would argue that allowing the uninitialized versions of A or B to exist could pose a problem. I would recommend that the object's take an IDataReader, IDictionary, or other interface from which they can be fully initialized. This then gives you the opportunity to verify integrity of the data after deserialization. I would tend to lean away from IDataReader myself as it's a fairly verbose interface, rather just a define a simple name/value lookup interface and use that. Then you can create an adapter class to provide whatever implementation is appropriate.

public class Database
{
    public static IEnumerable<T> ReadList<T>(IDataReader dr, Func<T> Create)
        where T : ICanRead
    {
        while (dr.Read())
        {
            T newOne = Create();
            newOne.ReadOne(dr);
            yield return newOne;
        }
    }

    public static void PopulateList<T>(List<T> list, IDataReader dr)
           where T : ICanRead, new()
    {
        list.AddRange(ReadList(dr, () => new T()));
    }
}

NOTE: I do not recommend using the PopulateList method above. Use of the generic 'new()' should be done with great care as it can be very expensive as compared to providing a delegate. See the following post: Optimization and generics, part 1: the new() constraint

NOTE 2: It's obvious your intent is to create an ORM layer. I would strongly advise against this unless it is for your education only. There are many good ORM technologies out there, I would go with MEF or NHibernate but don't build it.

NOTE 3: Although the IEnumerable/yield thing is cool, be careful. Make sure that the enumeration is complete before reusing the connection the reader is attached to or closing the reader for that matter.

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I"m afraid that while your intent is good, the answer is unhelpful. I will expand on why in the original question. –  The Evil Greebo Feb 9 '12 at 1:12

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