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I come from a Java/C++ OOP background and am trying to get into JavaScript "object-oriented" programming. I was looking through the source for a small framework and noticed something that I found odd. The framework defines some global functions, and then calls those functions from within the object's functions. To clarify, here's an example:

var MyObject = function() {

    function MyObject() {
        this.x = 5;
    }

    MyObject.prototype.getX = function() {
        return _MyObjectGetX( this );
    };

    return MyObject;
}();

var _MyObjectGetX = function( myObject ) {
    return myObject.x;
};

What I don't understand is the usage of the global function. Let's assume that global function is only used in one place: MyObject.getX(). Why not just move the return into the function body? Is this okay:

var MyObject = function() {

    function MyObject() {
        this.x = 5;
    }

    MyObject.prototype.getX = function() {
        return this.x;
    };

    return MyObject;
}();

This framework was written in CoffeeScript and then translated into JavaScript. Is this something that CoffeeScript does that may be unnecessary, or am I completely misunderstanding how JavaScript handles functions and objects (or rather, functions as objects)?

share|improve this question
    
It would probably better to post a real example, since there may be some reason that applies to the real example but does not apply to your made-up example. (I don't know if that's the case, but it seems quite possible.) –  ruakh Feb 8 '12 at 23:43
    
@ruakh If Brandan is right, the only thing different in the real example is that some of the global functions are getting called in multiple objects. However, sometimes that isn't the case. –  WillP Feb 9 '12 at 0:04
    
Do you have the CoffeeScript source-code for the framework? That might help narrow down the speculation. –  ruakh Feb 9 '12 at 2:56
    
Source at github. That isn't my account. This is an old JS framework for working with canvas that I was looking at to learn a bit about how games were written with canvas. My goal wasn't to learn CoffeeScript, so I was just working with the Javascript that was produced. After looking at the source a bit and playing more, I think the weird structure might be based off of this proprietary __extends() method used for inheritance. –  WillP Feb 9 '12 at 3:00

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

EDIT: sorry, misread your question.

In this case it looks like coffeescript is just being dumb...sort of like wysiwyg generated html.

var MyObject = function() {    
    function MyObject() {
        this.x = 5;
    }

    MyObject.prototype.getX = function() {
        return _MyObjectGetX( this ); // referencing a closure
    };

    return MyObject;
}();

var _MyObjectGetX = function( myObject ) {
    return myObject.x;
};

really has no advantage over the simpler

        var MyObject = function() {
            this.x = 5;
        };

        MyObject.prototype.getX = function() {
            return this.x;
        };

And the outer getter function used in the top coffeescript example seems to have no gain over a simple return. In fact, neither really seems to have a legitimate use for the getter, as there's no encapsulation being provided. The x property is readily available (and modifiable) on the object no matter where it is passed.

There my be some reasons why the framework opted to do this...but for this simple example I don't understand.

share|improve this answer
    
I understand that MyObject is not a global function, but I wasn't really talking about the "MyObject". I was asking about MyObject.prototype.getX() calling a (what I've always called) global function _MyObjectGetX() rather than just returning this.x. –  WillP Feb 9 '12 at 1:23
    
Sorry about that. Misread the post. Updated my answer accordingly. –  Gopherkhan Feb 9 '12 at 1:31
    
Thanks. The consensus seems to be that CoffeeScript is optimizing (or abstracting) when it may not need to. Since Brendan answered first, I'm gonna give it to him. Too bad you can't check more than one answer. Edit: sorry, didn't see the complete post edit. Thanks for the longer explanation. –  WillP Feb 9 '12 at 1:36
    
I upvoted Brendan to be fair :) –  Gopherkhan Feb 9 '12 at 3:50

This looks like a compiler optimization, probably a result of CoffeeScript translation.

It may be attempting to reuse this function in different contexts. You could pass any object into _MyObjectGetX and it would return that object's x property. So if it detects two methods that perform the same function, it could optimize away one of those and reduce the memory footprint of the application.

share|improve this answer
    
Ah, so maybe CoffeeScript assumes that the function might get reused in multiple objects. That's what I was thinking might be happening. Assuming the function won't get reused, it's safe to just return inside the MyObject's method? –  WillP Feb 9 '12 at 0:02
    
But it's not optimizing away a method: it's still creating a method, but that method is now a wrapper for an external function. (MyObject.prototype.getX is still a separate function from _MyObjectGetX, which it merely calls.) –  ruakh Feb 9 '12 at 0:08
    
@WillP That's what I was thinking, but I'm really not sure how CoffeeScript works. It seems like it would be a very seldom-used optimization. –  Brandan Feb 9 '12 at 2:45
    
@ruakh In this case, it's not. But if YourObject also defined an identical getX method, they could both simply wrap _MyObjectGetX, and if that function were sufficiently complex or if there were many such redundant methods, then this optimization might result in a smaller memory footprint. Again, I'm just speculating. –  Brandan Feb 9 '12 at 2:50
    
Sorry, but I really don't buy that. Determining that two functions are equivalent is very difficult. (In the general case, of course, it's literally impossible, but even if we allow a high rate of false negatives, it would be decidedly nontrivial to find even the simplest cases.) –  ruakh Feb 9 '12 at 2:55

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