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Here's my best attempt to recreate the situation.

public interface IFoo
{

}

public class Foo : IFoo { }

public class Bar : IFoo { }

public class CollectionOf<T> : List<IFoo>
{

}

public class Bars : CollectionOf<Bar>
{

}

public class Test
{
    public void Test()
    {
        CollectionOf<IFoo> bars = new Bars();
    }
}

Compiler complains on the instantiation. Bars is a collection of IFoos. Is this one of those covariance/contravariance issues?

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Thanks @EdS. What is the fix? –  Matthew Feb 8 '12 at 23:46
    
If you want support for covariance/contravariance, we will need to know whether CollectionOf is for reading from the collection or adding to the collection? It cannot be both and still support covariance or contravariance. –  Lukazoid Feb 9 '12 at 0:11

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The fix, if there is one would depend on what it is that's not working for you. I can get your example to compile in two ways, either use IEnumerable or define your CollectionOf as an interface with the out generic modifier. Whether either is a fix for you I don't know:

public interface IFoo { }

public class Foo : IFoo { }

public class Bar : IFoo { }

public interface CollectionOf<out T> : IEnumerable<IFoo> { }

public class Bars : CollectionOf<Bar> { }

public class Test
{
    public void Test()
    {
        IEnumerable<IFoo> bars1 = new Bars();
        CollectionOf<IFoo> bars2 = new Bars();
    }
}
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I believe this is what I'm looking for. I need to remove from CollectionOf, so the out is what I needed. –  Matthew Feb 9 '12 at 0:38

Yes.

Think about it for a second; bars should legally be able to hold objects of any type that implement IFoo. However, an object of type Bars can only hold objects of type Bar.

Using your code this would be allowed, which is obviously wrong.

CollectionOf<IFoo> bars = new Bars();
bars.Add( new Foo() );  // Uh oh!

That would effectively break the type safety afforded to you via generics.

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What if I promise to only put bars in that collection? Isn't that what the <in T> or <out T> are all about? –  Matthew Feb 8 '12 at 23:50
    
If you only want to put Bar in the collection, why not just use CollectionOf<Bar> bars = new Bars();? –  Lukazoid Feb 9 '12 at 0:14
    
@Matthew: No, they don't allow for incorrect behavior. You'll never be able to add a Foo to a collection of Bar unless you work solely via the interface. This isn't C++; generics are strongly typed. The situation that would ensure form your example would cause behavior that makes no sense and is not defined in the standard. –  Ed S. Feb 9 '12 at 0:15

Yes it is.

If this was allowed, you would be able to place any object into that collection, as long as it implemented the IFoo interface, but that wouldn't be safe for the collection.

Let me illustrate:

var b = new Bars();
CollectionOf<IFoo> bars = b;
bars.Add(Dummy); // implements IFoo, but does not descend from Bar

At this point, what does b contain? An object of type Dummy? That would be bad, and thus this is not allowed in the first place.

share|improve this answer
    
Damn your fast fingers.... –  Ed S. Feb 8 '12 at 23:48
    
Thank you, yes that makes perfect since. Where does <out T> come in to play? –  Matthew Feb 8 '12 at 23:55
1  
<out T> or covariance means that a class Foo<out T> can have its elements upcasted. For example, Foo<object> myFoo = new Foo<string>();. In this situation, T can only be used on return types (hence the out). For more information check out this link –  Lukazoid Feb 9 '12 at 0:04

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