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I am having an issue with my tableviews as I pop one tableview off my navigation controller and then pushing a new one on with similar data for the source. Somehow I am seeing cells from the old tableview. Any ideas?

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Hard to say without seeing code, but most likely culprit for this kind of error is if you are adding subviews to your tableView cells in cellForRowAtIndexPath: instead of modifying existing ones. Then, when the cells are reused, those subViews still exist and are appearing, even though you're also creating additional ones. –  yuji Feb 8 '12 at 23:50
    
Wow, just figured it out, I was dequeing cells to increase responsiveness and storing the references in memory, and when I popped the old tableview off I was setting it to animate the pop. This somehow held the cells in memory just long enough so that when I pushed the new UITableView on the stack, it was accessing the de-qued cells and presenting them instead of the new data. So if you plan on presenting similar data and are popping off a UITableView to replace it with the new data, pop it without animation... –  TChadwick Feb 8 '12 at 23:51
    
Nice catch! I bet [self.tableView reloadData]; flushes the cache as well, so you could pop with an animation and then call reload. –  Jack Lawrence Feb 9 '12 at 0:05
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2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

if these are two different table views you probably want to give them different reuse identifiers, e.g.

for the FirstTable: UITableViewCell* cell = [tableView dequeueReusableCellWithIdentifier:@"FirstTableViewCell"];

for the SecondTable: UITableViewCell* cell = [tableView dequeueReusableCellWithIdentifier:@"SecondTableViewCell"];

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Thanks for the ideas, in my case I was only having the issue when popping it off and replacing it with a refreshed list. It will be helpful to know for the future! –  TChadwick Feb 9 '12 at 15:19
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Wow, just figured it out, I was dequeing cells (And using Custom Cells) to increase responsiveness and storing the references in memory, and when I popped the old tableview off I was setting it to animate the pop. This somehow held the cells in memory just long enough so that when I pushed the new UITableView on the stack, it was accessing the de-qued cells and presenting them instead of the new data. So if you plan on presenting similar data and are popping off a UITableView to replace it with the new data, pop it without animation...
Or give them a specifically unique identifier as mentioned above. (But my solution was just to avoid using animation.

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