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I have these variables:

char** wordList_;
int wordListCapacity_;
int* wordCountList_;
char* fileName_;
int nUniqueWords_;
int nTotalWords_;
int nTotalCharacters_;

My copy constructor:

FileIndex::FileIndex(const FileIndex& fi)
{
    fileName_ = new char[strlen(fi.fileName_) + 1];
    strcpy(fileName_, fi.fileName_);
    cout << "Jiasd?" << endl;
    wordListCapacity_ = fi.wordListCapacity_;
    nUniqueWords_ = fi.nUniqueWords_;
    nTotalWords_ = fi.nTotalWords_;
    nTotalCharacters_ = fi.nTotalCharacters_;

    wordList_ = new char*[wordListCapacity_];
    wordCountList_ = new int[wordListCapacity_];
    for(int i = 0; i < nUniqueWords_; i++) {
        wordList_[i] = fi.wordList_[i];
        wordCountList_[i] = fi.wordCountList_[i];
    }
}

My overloaded assignment operator:

FileIndex& FileIndex::operator=(const FileIndex& fi)
{
    fileName_ = new char[strlen(fi.fileName_) + 1];
    strcpy(fileName_, fi.fileName_);
    wordListCapacity_ = fi.wordListCapacity_;
    nUniqueWords_ = fi.nUniqueWords_;
    nTotalWords_ = fi.nUniqueWords_;
    nTotalCharacters_ = fi.nTotalCharacters_;
    wordList_ = new char*[wordListCapacity_];
    wordCountList_ = new int[wordListCapacity_];
    for (int i = 0; i < nUniqueWords_; i++) {
        wordList_[i] = new char[strlen(fi.wordList_[i])+1];
        strcpy(wordList_[i], fi.wordList_[i]);
        wordCountList_[i] = fi.wordCountList_[i];
    }
    return *this;
}

Whenever I create a FileIndex (called FirstIndex) and initialize the member variables with something meaningful (not NULL) I have these lines to test the copy constructor and assignment operator:

FileIndex secondIndex = firstIndex;
FileIndex thirdIndex;
secondIndex = thirdIndex; // Segmentation fault here

I get a segmentation fault with the assignment operator but I have a feeling it may be because of faulty code in the copy constructor. That being said, if there's an error in the copy constructor then there's also probably one in the assignment operator.

Thanks in advance for the help!

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What happens when you simplify the class? –  Beta Feb 9 '12 at 0:17
    
What does your destructor look like? –  David Schwartz Feb 9 '12 at 0:17
    
Use std::vector instead, and your problems will likely go away. Also learn about ctor-initializer lists. –  Ben Voigt Feb 9 '12 at 0:18
    
nTotalWords_ = fi.nUniqueWords_; should be nTotalWords_ = fi.nTotalWords_; in the assignment operator, but I don't see that causing any problems in the code that you have posted. Have you tried running valgrind? –  Justin Peel Feb 9 '12 at 0:27
    
Please use std::string and std::vector all the problem with this code will then disappear. PS. Copy and swap idiom is your friend. –  Loki Astari Feb 9 '12 at 0:45
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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Check out your copy constructor.

for(int i = 0; i < nUniqueWords_; i++) {
    wordList_[i] = fi.wordList_[i];
    wordCountList_[i] = fi.wordCountList_[i];
}

The problem is with wordList_[i] = fi.wordList_[i];. You are not allocating new memory and doing a strcpy here as you do in the assignment operator. Instead your new copy is actually pointing to data from the instance that it is copying from. I believe this may be what David Schwartz was alluding to.

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I think you want to use std::string and std::vector<T> for your class. Also, for the purpose of what goes wrong it would be necessary to see the default constructor and the destructor. From the look of you setup it seems that you may e.g. not have initialized some of the members in your default constructor. Also, you assignment operator has several resource leaks and will be pretty bad off if you try self assignment. In general, I'd recommend to implement assignment operators like this:

T& T::operator= (T other) {
    other.swap(*this);
    return *this;
}

This leverages the work done for the copy constructor and use a swap() member which is generally very easy to do.

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It looks as if you may not initialize wordListCapacity_ correctly (it's hard to tell since you don't show the default ctor). Since it is an int, it can have a negative value, which can cause a segfault when you attempt wordList_ = new char*[wordListCapacity_];. There may be other problems.

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