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My reducer looks like this

public static class Reduce extends MapReduceBase implements Reducer<IntWritable, Text, IntWritable, Text> {

        List<Text> allRecords = new ArrayList<Text>();

        public void reduce(IntWritable key, Iterator<Text> values, OutputCollector<IntWritable, Text> output, Reporter reporter) throws IOException {

                allRecords.add(values.next());
                Text[] outputValues = new Text[7];
                for (int i=1; i>=7; i++) {
                    outputValues[i-1] = allRecords.get(allRecords.size() - i);
                }
        }
    }
  • I have just one reducer.
  • I need to collect first 7 records when reducer completes the job.

Question

  • How to do I know that end of reducer input is received
    Thank you
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won't this code fail with ArrayIndexOutOfBoundsException? allRecords has only 1 element. What do you mean by "end of reducer input is received"? –  Mateusz Dymczyk Feb 9 '12 at 0:44

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You should be looping through:

for (Text t : values) {

}

Or:

while (values.hasNext()) {
   Text t = values.next()
}
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but this will give me for just one key, what about if there are 100s o other keys ending up at this reducer –  daydreamer Feb 9 '12 at 3:52
1  
the function reduce gets called once per key. So the 100s of other keys will get applied the same function –  Donald Miner Feb 9 '12 at 4:19

I think you're misunderstanding the purpose of the key that you write out for each value that you've mapped. The purpose of the key is to group elements into particular calls to the reducer. Since you want all of the values in your code to be considered, at once, you need to use only a single key, as follows:

public class MyMapper<K extends WritableComparable, V extends Writable> 
     extends MapReduceBase implements Mapper<IntWriteable, WhateverTheInputTypeWas,
                                             IntWriteable, Text> {
  public void map(IntWriteable key, WhateverTheInputTypeWas val,
                  OutputCollector<IntWriteable, Text> output, Reporter reporter)

    // do some processing
    output.collect(new IntWriteable(1), ...);
  }
}

The infrastructure gathers all of the values for a particular key automatically, and presents them in a single call to reduce. That's why reduce takes an Iterator of values, not just a single value. All you need to do is iterate through the whole iterator, and when hasNext() returns false, that's when you've reached the end of the reduce function's input for that particular key.

public static class Reduce extends MapReduceBase 
                           implements Reducer<IntWritable, Text, 
                                              IntWritable, Text> {

  public void reduce(IntWritable key, Iterator<Text> values,
                     OutputCollector<IntWritable, Text> output,
                     Reporter reporter) throws IOException {

    int i=0
    Text[] outputValues = new Text[7];
    while (values.hasNext() && i < 7) {
      outputValues[i++] = values.next();
    }
    // now output the contents of outputValues to the OutputCollector
  }
}

If you need different keys for some other computation that you're doing in the reducer, just output those from the mapper as well, and have a special sentinel value (maybe -1, depending on what your keys mean) that gets output for every data element mapped, and then just run this special logic only when the key equals the sentinel value.

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If I understood Your question right, you need some notification when all data is processed by reducer.
One such point I know is close method in the output format:
public void close(TaskAttemptContext context)
You can override this method in your output format. It will be called after associated reducer finished its work.

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It is quite late but it may be helpful for the ones who search for same question.

Open a file and write it to that file what ever you want to see.

For example, to see which Reduce worker does what part of your code you can do the following:

class myReducer extends Reducer{
     File f;
     void setup(){
          // open your file here
     }
     void reduce(){
          //write key/value or whatever whatever you want to see here
          //and your reduce method
     }
}

By this way you could easily see what is your mistake etc...

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