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I have some vector of elements passed to a function and I want to create all of the vectors that are that original vector, but with one element missing.

What is the simplest way to do this in C++?

My current approach is something of the following, but not quite worked out yet.

void list_one_removed(std::vector<Fruit> fruit)
{
    for (unsigned i = fruit.size(); i > 0; i--)
    {
        // copy 'fruit'
        // remove index i
        // add this vector to some vector of vectors.
    }
}
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too vague, will get closed unless you add more detail (input/output and possibly your current code). –  Nim Feb 9 '12 at 0:46
    
It seems the answer is pretty simple when you show us some code! –  guitarflow Feb 9 '12 at 0:55
1  
The simplest would be to iterate over the length of the vector: make a copy and delete the kth element from it. Is that good enough? –  Beta Feb 9 '12 at 1:01
    
Thanks, I'll update with code now. –  Jim Feb 9 '12 at 1:02
    
@Beta yeah, that's generally what I was doing, but it seems like it wouldn't be the best way. I've updated the question with my initial hypothesized approach –  Jim Feb 9 '12 at 1:05

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Well, just use an iterator to identify the currently removed position and create a vector from everything up to this iterator and everything after this iterator:

std::vector<decltype(vec)> result;
for (auto it(vec.begin()), end(vec.end()); it != end; ) {
    result.push_back(decltype(vec)(vec.begin(), it));
    result.back().insert(result.back().end(), ++it, vec.end());
}
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Thanks for the answer. I'm having trouble understanding a bit of the syntax. What in this skips the current location of the iterator? And is 'result' a vector of vector of Fruit objects? The decltype notation is new to me. Thanks :) –  Jim Feb 9 '12 at 3:26
1  
First the decltype(expr) is just determining the type of the expression expr. It is a new feature in C++2011. So, yes, result is a vector of vectors. Other than this, the magic is in the sequences of iterators taken to constructor the iterator at the end of result: it is constructed from the sequence [begin, it) and then the sequence [++it, end). The magic skipping the "current" element is in the ++it which skips over it. –  Dietmar Kühl Feb 9 '12 at 5:33

Using <algorithm> and C++11:

#include <algorithm>
#include <vector>

// personally, I would pass "in" as a couple of iterators
template<typename T>
std::vector<std::vector<T>> list_one_removed(const std::vector<T>& in)

{
    std::vector<std::vector<T>> result;
    for (auto itor = in.begin(); itor != in.end(); ++itor) {
        std::vector<T> buffer;
        std::copy_if(in.begin(),
                     in.end(),
                     std::back_inserter(buffer),
                     [&itor](const T& t){ return &t != &(*itor); });
        result.emplace_back(std::move(buffer));
    }
    return result;
}

If you have the new "for each" loop, you can do:

#include <algorithm>
#include <vector>

template<typename T>
std::vector<std::vector<T>> list_one_removed(const std::vector<T>& in)
{
    std::vector<std::vector<T>> result;
    for (const auto& foo : in) {
        std::vector<T> buffer;
        std::copy_if(in.begin(),
                     in.end(),
                     std::back_inserter(buffer),
                     [&foo](const T& t){ return &t != &foo; });
        result.emplace_back(std::move(buffer));
    }
    return result;
}

If you're using C++03:

#include <algorithm>
#include <vector>

template<typename T> struct identity {
    const T& id_;
    identity(const T& id) : id_(id) { }

    bool operator()(const T& other) const
    {
        return &id_ == &other;
    }
};

template<typename T>
std::vector<std::vector<T> > list_one_removed(const std::vector<T>& in)
{
    std::vector<std::vector<T> > result;
    for (typename std::vector<T>::const_iterator itor = in.begin();
         itor != in.end();
         ++itor) {
        std::vector<T> buffer;
        std::remove_copy_if(in.begin(),
                            in.end(),
                            std::back_inserter(buffer),
                            identity<T>(*itor));
        result.push_back(buffer);
    }
    return result;
}
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Dietmar's answer should be more efficient, and much more for your C++03 variant with its unneccessary vector copy at the end. But also the C++11 variants with their many comparisons and push_back-caused reallocations aren't that optimal. –  Christian Rau Feb 9 '12 at 9:19
    
@Christian: I originally had calls to std::vector::reserve to avoid needless reallocations. However, I removed them because (1) they cluttered the example code, and (2) I have a hunch we're talking about vectors with less than 10 elements. As for the C++03 version: you have heard of return value optimization, named return value optimization and copy elision, right? –  Max Lybbert Feb 9 '12 at 16:59
    
Well yes, I have. But I don't have that much believe into the compiler to just leave out such a simple optimization (push and use back instead of temporary and push). I doubt that push_back will really elide the internal copy of buffer, given that it takes it as a const reference and doesn't itself know that buffer is destroyed right after the call, that's what the new move semantics are for. –  Christian Rau Feb 9 '12 at 17:10
    
@Christian, I think we're now talking about different things w/r/t C++03. RVO, copy elision, etc. only help on the return result; line. You are correct that the C++03 push_back calls do make an unnecessary temporary; which is why the C++11 version uses emplace_back. You are correct that I could push_back an empty vector and manipulate it. I'll keep it in mind, although I'll leave it out of the sample code for the same reason I removed the reserve calls: it affects clarity (I added the C++03 code because my original statement that "C++03 would be similar" was overly-optimistic). –  Max Lybbert Feb 9 '12 at 18:55

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