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I want my variable array (in JavaScript) to have 2 values: a quote on it, and a true or false value. This is the part of the code preferable to put it in:

var q = new Array()



q[0]='There are some people who live in a dream world, and there are some who face reality; and then there are those who turn one into the other. <i>-By Douglas Everett</i>'

q[1]='Whether you think you can or whether you think you can\'t, you\'re right! <i>-Henry Ford</i>'

q[2]='I know of no more encouraging fact than the unquestionable ability of man to elevate his life by conscious endeavor. <i>-Henry David Thoreau</i>'

q[3]='Do not let what you cannot do interfere with what you can do. <i>-John Wooden</i>'

That's one of many quotes that I have (soon to be trivia, I borrowed some code from another site to generate one of these randomly.) I want, for instance, q[3] to be a quote and a true or false value.

Is this possible? Any suggestions on how I should do it otherwise?

I'm a beginner scripter, so sorry if this is an obvious question.

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7 Answers 7

You can use object literals with a property to hold the quote and another to hold the boolean. So, for example:

var q = []; // NEVER use new Array() and ALWAYS put a semicolon at the end of lines.

q[0] = {
    quote: 'There are some people who live in a dream world, and there are some who face reality; and then there are those who turn one into the other. <i>-By Douglas Everett</i>',
    someValue: true
};

// ...

alert(q[0].quote); // There are some people...
alert(q[0].someValue); // true
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All of your answers were very useful, and very fast. I found this one to be thorough and neat, thanks, minitech! –  Z91www Feb 9 '12 at 0:56
    
I would not say "NEVER use new Array()", it actually has a lot more to do with style. [] is more terse and easier to read, but nothing wrong with using new Array(). –  arturnt Feb 9 '12 at 0:58
2  
@arturnt: Yeah, actually, there is stuff wrong with using new Array. new Array(1, 2, 3, 4, 5) is [1, 2, 3, 4, 5] but new Array(5) is [,,,,]. Plus, Array can be redefined to be any function; [] will always give you an array. –  minitech Feb 9 '12 at 1:00
1  
@arturnt: It can be incredibly confusing. There is no good reason to ever use new Array(element1, element2, elementN...) over [element1, element2, elementN...] and if you're using new Array(nElements) then it's probably either 1) pre-optimization or 2) a hacky way of repeating a string. Repeating a string in that way might be okay, but the pre-optimization is usually unnecessary and can only serve to confuse future editors of the code. –  minitech Feb 9 '12 at 1:13
1  
Oh, and what's the downvote for? –  minitech Feb 9 '12 at 1:14

Ok, If I follow you, what you want is an array of objects:

[{flag: true, text: "If you choose the red pill..."},...]

Does that make sense?

The key is that you want a JS object on every element of the array.

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Make it an array in its own right.

q[3] = ['My string....', true];

Then use q[3][0] to access "My string...." and q[3][1] to access the Boolean value.


As a side note, when you create an array, you should use the shorthand [] notation instead of new Array():

var q = [];
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I wince every time I see that... it leads to magic array indexing. –  minitech Feb 9 '12 at 0:54

Use nested arrays.

q[0] = ['Some quote',true];

Then q[0][0] is the quote and q[0][1] is the true/false value.

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Same as above; what's the magic number 1 supposed to mean? –  minitech Feb 9 '12 at 0:58
var q = new Array()



q[0]= ['There are some people who live in a dream world, and there are some who face reality; and then there are those who turn one into the other. <i>-By Douglas Everett</i>', true]

q[1]=['Whether you think you can or whether you think you can\'t, you\'re right! <i>-Henry Ford</i>', false]

q[2]=['I know of no more encouraging fact than the unquestionable ability of man to elevate his life by conscious endeavor. <i>-Henry David Thoreau</i>', true]

q[3]=['Do not let what you cannot do interfere with what you can do. <i>-John Wooden</i>', false]

if (q[3][1]) {
    print q[3][0]
}
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I would probably use an object literal for that. Something like:

var q = [];

q[0]= {Question: 'There are some people who live in a dream world, and there are some who face reality; and then there are those who turn one into the other. <i>-By Douglas Everett</i>', Answer: true};
q[1]= {Question: 'Whether you think you can or whether you think you can\'t, you\'re right! <i>-Henry Ford</i>', Answer: true};
q[2]= {Question: 'I know of no more encouraging fact than the unquestionable ability of man to elevate his life by conscious endeavor. <i>-Henry David Thoreau</i>', Answer: false};
q[3]= {Question: 'Do not let what you cannot do interfere with what you can do. <i>-John Wooden</i>', Answer: false};

window.alert(q[1].Question);
window.alert(q[1].Answer);
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Many ways of doing it, here are three:

var q = [];
q.push("Quote#1");
q.push(true);
q.push("Quote#2");
q.push(false);

for(var i = 0; i < q.length-1; i++) {
    console.log(q[i], q[i+1]);
}

or

var q = [];
q.push({quote: "Quote#1", flag: true});
q.push({quote: "Quote#2", flag: false});
for (var i = 0; i < q.length; i++) {
    console.log(q[i].quote, q[i].flag);
}

or

var q = [];
q.push(["Quote#1", true]);
q.push(["Quote#2", false]);
for (var i = 0; i < q.length; i++) {
    console.log(q[i][0], q[i][1]);
}
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