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In my viewmodel, I have a list of items I fetch from the database and then send to the view. I would like to know if it's possible to avoid having to refill the options property whenever I hit a Post action and need to return the model (for validation errors and what not)?

In webforms, this wouldn't be necessary.

Edit: I was not clear. My problem is with the SelectList options I use for my DropDownLists. Everything gets posted, but if I have to return to the view (model is invalid), I have to reload the options from the database! I want to know if this can be avoided.

My viewmodel:

public class TestModel
{
    public TestModel()
    {
        Departments = new List<SelectListItem>();
    }

    public string Name { get; set; }
    public int Department { get; set; }
    public IEnumerable<SelectListItem> Departments { get; set; }
}

My view:

@model MvcApplication1.Models.TestModel    
@using (Html.BeginForm())
{
    @Html.TextBoxFor(m => m.Name)

    @Html.DropDownListFor(m => m.Department, Model.Departments)

    <input type=submit value=Submit />
}

My controller (do notice the comment on HttpPost):

public ActionResult Index()
{
    TestModel model = new TestModel
    {
        Name = "Rafael",
        Department = 1,
        Departments = new List<SelectListItem>
        {
            new SelectListItem { Text = "Sales", Value = "1" },
            new SelectListItem { Text = "Marketing", Value = "2", Selected = true },
            new SelectListItem { Text = "Development", Value = "3" }
        }
    };

    // Departments gets filled from a database.

    return View(model);
}

[HttpPost]
public ActionResult Index(TestModel model)
{
if (!ModelState.IsValid)
{
    //Do I have to fill model.Departments again!?!?!?

    return View(model); 
}
else { ...  }
}

Thanks in advance.

Edit: FYI, my solution was to use the Session variable.

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Just need to strongly type your view, and change your controller method to have a parameter of that class type.

That is, the view

@model MyNamesspace.Models.MyModel
...
@using (Html.BeginForm())
{
    ....
}

And you controller method which is posted to.

[HttpPost]
public ActionResult MyAction(MyModel model)
{
    ...
}

EDIT: Also make sure you have form fields for each property of the model which you need posted to the controller. My example is using Razor too BTW.

share|improve this answer
    
Care to see my edit? –  rebelliard Feb 9 '12 at 2:23
    
OK I see what you mean now. I had the same issue come up with my last project. Unfortunately, using an HTTP post is inherently going to limit your model to the equivalent of key-value pairs. That is, you can't have a complex model with more business objects as properties returned to the controller. So you will have to store the departments list somewhere persistent. Session would be appropriate for this, as long as you clear it when you're done. If you really, really need to send objects over the wire, you need to use JSON or some other serialization technique. –  jhsowter Feb 9 '12 at 2:37
    
I see. Would you recommend passing the data back from a JSON inside a hidden input or a Session[] object? Thanks. –  rebelliard Feb 9 '12 at 2:39
    
I would use (and did use) the Session because it's easy to use, sends less over the wire (which you don't need to do because the data isn't changed by the browser) and it avoids another database hit. The Session is unique to the user. It depends which session state management technique you're using, but the default is inProc which is fine unless you're super short on memory for some reason. –  jhsowter Feb 9 '12 at 2:46
    
Thank you. This indeed work. :) –  rebelliard Feb 9 '12 at 2:53

I encountered a similar problem when trying to create an Order wizard in MVC (one where each page of the wizard is implemented as a partial view loaded by AJAX). I highly doubt it is the suggested method but my way of solving this was to call a custom MergeChanges method in each action called by my wizard:

public Order MergeChanges(Order newOrder)
{
    var sessionHistory = (List<string>)Session["sessionHistory"];

    if (sessionHistory == null || sessionHistory.Count == 0)
    return MergeChanges(newOrder, -1);

    return MergeChanges(newOrder, MasterViewController.GetStepNumberByName(sessionHistory.Last()));
}

public Order MergeChanges(Order newOrder, int step)
{
    PreMerge(newOrder);

    Order result = null;
    try
    {
        ApplyLookups(ref newOrder);
        Order oldOrder = (Order)Session["order"];

        if (oldOrder == null)
        {
             Session["order"] = newOrder;
             result = newOrder;
        }
        else
        {
            List<TypeHelper.DecoratedProperty<ModelPageAttribute>> props = null;
            newOrder.GetType().GetDecoratedProperty<ModelPageAttribute>(ref props);
            props = props.Where(p => (p.Attributes.Count() > 0 && p.Attributes.First().PageNumber.Contains(step))).ToList();
            foreach (var propPair in props)
            {
                object oldObj = oldOrder;
                object newObj = newOrder;
                if (!string.IsNullOrEmpty(propPair.PropertyPath))
                {
                    bool badProp = false;
                    foreach (string propStr in propPair.PropertyPath.Split('\\'))
                    {
                        var prop = oldObj.GetType().GetProperty(propStr);
                        if (prop == null)
                        {
                            badProp = true;
                            break;
                        }

                        oldObj = prop.GetValue(oldObj, BindingFlags.GetProperty, null, null, null);
                        newObj = prop.GetValue(newObj, BindingFlags.GetProperty, null, null, null);
                     }
                     if (badProp)
                          continue;
                 }

                 if (newObj == null)
                     continue;

                 var srcVal = propPair.Property.GetValue(newObj, BindingFlags.GetProperty, null, null, null);
                 var dstVal = propPair.Property.GetValue(oldObj, BindingFlags.GetProperty, null, null, null);

                  var mergeHelperAttr = propPair.Property.GetAttribute<MergeHelperAttribute>();
                   if (mergeHelperAttr == null)
                   {
                        if (newObj != null)
                            propPair.Property.SetValue(oldObj, srcVal, BindingFlags.SetProperty, null, null, null);
                   }
                   else
                   {
                       var mergeHelper = (IMergeHelper)Activator.CreateInstance(mergeHelperAttr.HelperType);
                       if (mergeHelper == null)
                           continue;

                       mergeHelper.Merge(context, HttpContext.Request, newObj, propPair.Property, srcVal, oldObj, propPair.Property, dstVal);
                    }
               }
               result = oldOrder;
          }
    }
    finally
    {
    PostMerge(result);
    }
    return result;
}

Since my case was doing this with a wizard, only specific values applied to each page so in order to only account for properties known to the current page of the wizard, I've implemented some attributes, a (admittedly over complex) ViewController layer, and a custom validation layer. I can share some more code but the code above does the grunt work if you aren't in such a complex situation. If there is a better way, I hope to learn it from the answers to this question because this was a PITA.

share|improve this answer
    
Wow. I appreciate your answer. I was started to think about saving the values in hiddens in JSON and then reading off of them. Any thoughts? –  rebelliard Feb 9 '12 at 2:31
    
Depending on the requirements of your web app that could work. It feels really dirty though and if you have a large set of fields this could be heavy. It would probably work though. In my case, I had over 150 complex dynamic fields to be accounted for so it wasn't really an option. I hope you will find a better solution. –  M.Babcock Feb 9 '12 at 2:34

I am surprised this question doesn't come up more often, and I am also surprised the obvious (IMHO) answer isn't standard practice these days: nearly all POSTs should be Ajax-based. This solves a whole slew of problems including

  1. No need to repopulate form data when you have e.g. a validation error, or application error (exception). This is particularly desirable when you have client-side state (in true rich web application fashion).
  2. No compulsion to perform client-side validation. Validation can be 100% server-side (where it must be anyways) and the user experience is nearly the same.

Of course, there is some initial work you need to do to build out a framework for this, for example, I have a set of AjaxUpdate, AjaxNothing, AjaxRedirect, AjaxErrors ... ActionResult types which render Json which is processed by some custom Javascript. But once you get that in place, it's smooth sailing.

share|improve this answer
    
Validation can be 100% server-side (where it must be anyways), I was under the impression that MS was leaning more towards client side validation by pushing the DataAnnotation stuff. Granted I haven't spent enough time in this realm to actually understand what is going on, but all of the tutorials you find on MVC3 and validation seem to push for the "Unobtrustive Javascript"/DataAnnotation approach. Am I missing something? –  M.Babcock Feb 9 '12 at 3:39
    
@M.Babcock - I think what MS has been trying to do with DataAnnotations and "Unobtrusive Javascript" is to solve the problem of duplicated client-side and server-side validation with a different approach: configure the DataAnnotations, and the framework will perform both server-side and client-side validation transparently, but in any case server-side validation is authoritative and client-side validation is only for user experience. However, my solution removes the problem entirely (a problem I am claiming is outmoded). –  Stephen Swensen Feb 9 '12 at 4:21
    
@M.Babcock - Note that I still do use DataAnnotations (well, I've been preferring FluentValidation lately), but I perform the validation server-side and return the errors with an AjaxErrors Json response which is rendered with Javascript by an Ajax onsuccess callback. –  Stephen Swensen Feb 9 '12 at 4:25
    
That all makes sense, though if we're going to provide server side validations anyway then I question the value of client side validations pushed in HTML5. It's a moot point though. The code referenced in my answer in one small part of a much larger framework I built to handle the problem proposed by the question in a Wizard situation. One small component of that provides a meager attempt at partial model validation since DataAnnotations failed to provide a graceful alternative. The code is ugly but functional. –  M.Babcock Feb 9 '12 at 4:31

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