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Okay I've read through a massive amount of of the answers here on SO, and many other places but I just can't seem to grasp this simple function. Please forgive me for something so simple I haven't done c/c++ code in over 8 years and I'm very much trying to re-learn, so please have patience...

I've tried many different ways to do this from assigning a string through a function param by shifting in the value to just straight returning it, but nothing seems to work within the while. I also get no errors during compile time, but I do get segfaults at runtime. I would very much like to find out why the following function does not work... I just don't understand why the else returns fine as type char *content, but strcat(content, line); does not. Even though the man pages for strcat shows that strcat's definition should be (char *DEST, const char *SRC). As I currently understand it trying to do a cast to a const char on the line variable within the while would just return an integer to the pointer. So I'm stumped here and would like to be educated by those who have some time!

char * getPage(char *filename) {
    FILE *pFile;
    char *content;
    pFile = fopen(filename, "r");
    if (pFile != NULL) {
        syslog(LOG_INFO,"Reading from:%s",filename);
        char line [256];
        while (fgets(line, sizeof line, pFile) != NULL) {
            syslog(LOG_INFO,">>>>>>>Fail Here<<<<<<<");
            strcat(content, line);
        }
        fclose(pFile);
    } else {
        content = "<!DOCTYPE html><html lang=\"en-US\"><head><title>Test</title></head><body><h1>Does Work</h1></body></html>";
        syslog(LOG_INFO,"Reading from:%s failed, serving static response",filename);
    }
    return content;
}

Very much appreciate all the great answers in this post. I would give everyone in the discussion a checkmark but unfortunately I can't...

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6 Answers 6

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This is pretty simple, but very surprising if you're used to a higher-level language. C does not manage memory for you, and C doesn't really have strings. That content variable is a pointer, not a string. You have to manually allocate the space you need for the string before calling strcat. The correct way to write this code is something like this:

FILE *fp = fopen(filename, "r");
if (!fp) {
    syslog(LOG_INFO, "failed to open %s: %s", filename, strerror(errno));
    return xstrdup("<!DOCTYPE html><html lang=\"en-US\"><head><title>Test</title>"
                  "</head><body><h1>Does Work</h1></body></html>");
} else {
    size_t capacity = 4096, offset = 0, n;
    char *content = xmalloc(capacity);
    size_t n;
    while ((n = fread(content + offset, 1, capacity - offset, fp)) > 0) {
        offset += n;
        if (offset == capacity) {
            capacity *= 2;
            content = xrealloc(content, capacity);
        }
    }
    if (n < 0)
        syslog(LOG_INFO, "read error from %s: %s", filename, strerror(errno));
    content[offset] = '\0';
    fclose(fp);
    return content;
}

Notes:

  1. Error messages triggered by I/O failures should ALWAYS include strerror(errno).
  2. xmalloc, xrealloc, and xstrdup are wrapper functions around their counterparts with no leading x; they crash the program rather than return NULL. This is almost always less grief than trying to recover from out-of-memory by hand in every single place where it can happen.
  3. I return xstrdup("...") rather than "..." in the failed-to-open case so that the caller can always call free(content). Calling free on a string literal will crash your program.
  4. Gosh, that was a lot of work, wasn't it? This is why people tend to prefer to write web apps in a higher-level language. ;-)
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I'm humbled; in 19 additional seconds you re-wrote the thing. Nice. :) –  sarnold Feb 9 '12 at 2:41
    
xmalloc is not in C - and honestly - you've run out of memory - what are you going to do to recover anyways? Crashing is the best option. –  Adrian Cornish Feb 9 '12 at 2:51
    
Okay so I followed this answer the easiest as I see the re-allocation of memory on content. I did have to change the xmalloc and xstrdup to be strdup malloc and realloc but it appears to be working fine. The pages that I will be pulling will never be massive pages, they probably never would go over 1k in size even. Is there an issue with running out of memory etc @AdrianCornish. –  Will H Feb 9 '12 at 2:59
    
@user1198639 On a modern machine it is unlikely that running out of memory will ever be an issue - and more to the point what are you going to do about it. If there is no memory left - catastrophic failure of your program is the best option. –  Adrian Cornish Feb 9 '12 at 3:13
    
@AdrianCornish Since malloc and realloc will try to just assign more memory to hold the data, is there is prefunc that I could run to test and see if in fact there is enough memory available first? For instance check free memory - the content pointer size + (100 * content)? I'm saying 100 * the size of content as other applications on the system may allocate memory at the same time, so I'm just using this as an example, that if there isn't more than that left error out the program instead of crashing? –  Will H Feb 9 '12 at 3:23

You need to allocate memory for content. It has to be big enough for the entire file the way you are doing it. You can either allocate a huge buffer up front and hope for the best, or allocate a smaller one and realloc it as needed.

Even better would be rearranging the code to avoid the need for storing the whole file all at once, although if your caller needs a whole web page as a string, that may be hard.

Note also that you need to return the same type of memory from both your code paths. You can't return a static string sometimes and a heap-allocated string other times. That's guaranteed to call headaches and/or memory leaks. So if you are copying the file contents into a block of memory, you should also copy the static string into the same type of block.

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I realized based on the example of Zack that I did have 2 different types, although this is something that I've completely forgotten about as I've been working on more high level languages recently. The function itself does need to return the whole page though, as it is served directly from that function as an intercept to the standard page that is displayed. If I did have a function that returns content from a page would it better to return line by line for small amounts of data assigned? Besides memory allocation what would be the advantage to that? –  Will H Feb 9 '12 at 3:07
    
My comment does not really apply to your particular situation, where the desired output is a single page. But as a rule, a single giant text buffer is a sub-optimal data structure to work with. Almost every operation becomes O(N). And you need to deal with either picking some memory limit ahead of time and dealing with potential overflows, or reallocating as needed, including copying the data, which again has O(N) time. It is often better to parse the text on the fly into a more managable data strucutre, whether that be a list, tree, hash, or whatever else your application demands. –  AShelly Feb 9 '12 at 18:05

content is just a pointer to a string not an actual string - it has 0 bytes of space reserved for your string. You need to allocate memory large enough to hold hour string. Note that after you will have to free it

char *content=malloc(256);

And your code should be ok - oh and I suggest using strncat

The 2nd assignment to content worked ok before - because you are setting the pointer to point to your const string. If you change content to a malloc'ed region of memory - then you would also want to strncpy your fixed string into content.

Ideally if you can use C++ std::string.

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char *foo is only a pointer to some piece of memory holding the characters that form the string. So you cannot use strcat because you don't have any memory to copy to. Inside the if statement you are allocating local memory on the stack with char line[256] that holds the line, but since that memory is local for the function is will disappear once it returns, so you cannot return line;.

So what you really want is to allocate some persistent memory, e.g. with strdup or malloc, so that you can return it from the function. Note that you cannot mix constants and allocated memory (because the user of your function must free the memory - which is only possible if it is not a constant).

So you could use something like this:

char * getPage(const char *filename) {
    FILE *pFile;
    char *content;
    pFile = fopen(filename, "r");
    if (pFile != NULL) {
        syslog(LOG_INFO,"Reading from:%s",filename);
        /* check the size and allocate memory */
        fseek(pFile, 0, SEEK_END);
        if (!(content = malloc(ftell(pfile) + 1))) { /* out of memory ... */ }
        rewind(pFile);
        /* set the content to be empty */
        *content = 0;
        char line [256];
        while (fgets(line, sizeof line, pFile) != NULL) {
            syslog(LOG_INFO,">>>>>>>Fail Here<<<<<<<");
            strcat(content, line);
        }
        fclose(pFile);
    } else {
        content = strdup("<!DOCTYPE html><html lang=\"en-US\"><head><title>Test</title></head><body><h1>Does Work</h1></body></html>");
        syslog(LOG_INFO,"Reading from:%s failed, serving static response",filename);
    }
    return content;
}

It is not the most efficient way of doing this (because strcat has to find the end every time), but the least modification of your code.

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Nice re-writing, but note the file can grow after you've measured its size, making the repeated strcat() calls unsafe and potential security problem. –  sarnold Feb 9 '12 at 3:18
1  
That was not a rewrite - the idea was to add as little as possible. But, yes, your'e right about the growing file. Admittedly, I wouldn't do it that way, but I thought explaining how to create a dynamically growing buffer may be too much -- but judging by the accepted answer (which was a re-write) I guess not ;) –  Simon Urbanek Feb 9 '12 at 4:06

An earlier answer suggested the solution:

char content[256];

This buffer will not be large enough to hold anything but the smallest files and the pointer content goes out of scope when return content; is executed. (Your earlier line, content = "static.."; is fine, because the string is placed in the .rodata data segment and its pointer will always point to the same data, for the entire lifetime of the program.)

If you allocate the memory for content with malloc(3), you can "grow" the space required with realloc(3), but this introduces the potential for a horrible error -- whatever you handed the pointer to must clean up after the memory allocation when it is done with the data (or else you leak memory), and it cannot simply call free(3) because the content pointer might be to statically allocated memory.

So, you have two easy choices:

  • use strdup(3) to duplicate the static string each time you need it, and use content = malloc(size); for the non-static path
  • make your caller responsible for providing the memory; every call needs to provide sufficient memory to handle either the contents of the file or the static string.

I would probably prefer the first approach, if only because the size needed for the second approach cannot be known prior to the call.

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Yeah I was wrong. I missed the return of a local var - I've updated my answer for storage on the heap. –  Adrian Cornish Feb 9 '12 at 2:49
    
Freeing the memory for this particular function I'm 100% fine with as I've had some major issues in the past with memory leaks so at this point I generally try to free(xvar); to just check and make sure that it does need to be free'd or not, as kdevelop yells if it does not need to be free'd so I feel rather safe than sorry, and if it misses it the app would crash rather than causing the leak. Question here though would be whether the pointer needs to be NULLED afterwards? –  Will H Feb 9 '12 at 3:05
1  
You do not need to NULL a free'ed pointer but it is good practice to do this - that way other code knows that it is unallocated. –  Adrian Cornish Feb 9 '12 at 3:10
    
@Adrian: excellent, I've amended by answer a bit to match. –  sarnold Feb 9 '12 at 3:19
    
@user1198639: KDevelop cannot always know if variable may be freed: Consider your original version of getPage() and the following line: char *to_client = getPage("/etc/passwd"); KDevelop cannot know if free (to_client) is a security flaw or preventing a memory leak because the value of to_client depends upon a run-time condition. (A language like Cyclone would forbid this, but C is happy to let you shoot yourself in the foot.) –  sarnold Feb 9 '12 at 3:22

content is a wild pointer; the variable contains garbage, so it's pointing somewhere into left field. When you copy data to it using strcat, the data goes to some random, probably bad, location. The cure for this is to make content point somewhere good. Since you want it to outlive your function call, it needs to be allocated someplace besides the function's call stack. You need to use malloc() to allocate some space on the heap. Then the caller will own the memory, and should call free() to delete it when it's no longer needed.

You'll need to change the else part that directly assigns to content, as well, to use strcpy, so that the free() will always be valid. You can't free something that you didn't allocate!

Through all of this code, make sure you remember how much space you allocated with malloc(), and don't write more data than you have space, or you'll get more crashes.

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