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I am a Java guy and I'm trying to do an assignment with C++ for a class. I am having trouble declaring a variable of a type I created as a property of another class. This is my approach

  private:
    HeatingUnit heatingUnit;
    int tempToMaintain;

  public:
    BangBangControl(int tempToMaintain, bool isOn, int initialTemp){
      heatingUnit= new HeatingUnit(isOn, initialTemp);
      this -> tempToMaintain = tempToMaintain;
    }

I get this error

BangBangControl.cpp: In constructor ‘BangBangControl::BangBangControl(int, bool, int)’: BangBangControl.cpp:15: error: no match for ‘operator=’ in ‘((BangBangControl*)this)->BangBangControl::heatingUnit = (((HeatingUnit*)operator new(8u)), (->HeatingUnit::HeatingUnit(((int)isOn), initialTemp), ))’ HeatingUnit.h:6: note: candidates are: HeatingUnit& HeatingUnit::operator=(const HeatingUnit&) BangBangControl.cpp: In member function ‘int BangBangControl::main()’: BangBangControl.cpp:37: error: no match for ‘operator<<’ in ‘std::operator<< [with _Traits = std::char_traits](((std::basic_ostream >&)((std::basic_ostream >*)((std::basic_ostream >*)std::operator<< [with _Traits = std::char_traits](((std::basic_ostream >&)(& std::cout)), ((const char*)"Temp to maintain is: ")))->std::basic_ostream<_CharT, _Traits>::operator<< [with _CharT = char, _Traits = std::char_traits](bBC. BangBangControl::getTemp()))), ((const char*)" Current temp is: ")) << bBC. BangBangControl::update()’ /usr/include/c++/4.2.1/ostream:112: note: candidates are: std::basic_ostream<_CharT, _Traits>& std::basic_ostream<_CharT, _Traits>::operator<<(std::basic_ostream<_CharT, _Traits>& (*)(std::basic_ostream<_CharT, _Traits>&)) [with _CharT = char, _Traits = std::char_traits] /usr/include/c++/4.2.1/ostream:121: note: std::basic_ostream<_CharT, _Traits>& std::basic_ostream<_CharT, _Traits>::operator<<(std::basic_ios<_CharT, _Traits>& (*)(std::basic_ios<_CharT, _Traits>&)) [with _CharT = char, _Traits = std::char_traits] /usr/include/c++/4.2.1/ostream:131: note: std::basic_ostream<_CharT, _Traits>& std::basic_ostream<_CharT, _Traits>::operator<<(std::ios_base& (*)(std::ios_base&)) [with _CharT = char, _Traits = std::char_traits] /usr/include/c++/4.2.1/ostream:169: note: std::basic_ostream<_CharT, _Traits>& std::basic_ostream<_CharT, _Traits>::operator<<(long int) [with _CharT = char, _Traits = std::char_traits] /usr/include/c++/4.2.1/ostream:173: note: std::basic_ostream<_CharT, _Traits>& std::basic_ostream<_CharT, _Traits>::operator<<(long unsigned int) [with _CharT = char, _Traits = std::char_traits] /usr/include/c++/4.2.1/ostream:177: note: std::basic_ostream<_CharT, _Traits>& std::basic_ostream<_CharT, _Traits>::operator<<(bool) [with _CharT = char, _Traits = std::char_traits] /usr/include/c++/4.2.1/bits/ostream.tcc:92: note: std::basic_ostream<_CharT, _Traits>& std::basic_ostream<_CharT, _Traits>::operator<<(short int) [with _CharT = char, _Traits = std::char_traits] /usr/include/c++/4.2.1/ostream:184: note: std::basic_ostream<_CharT, _Traits>& std::basic_ostream<_CharT, _Traits>::operator<<(short unsigned int) [with _CharT = char, _Traits = std::char_traits] /usr/include/c++/4.2.1/bits/ostream.tcc:106: note: std::basic_ostream<_CharT, _Traits>& std::basic_ostream<_CharT, _Traits>::operator<<(int) [with _CharT = char, _Traits = std::char_traits] /usr/include/c++/4.2.1/ostream:195: note: std::basic_ostream<_CharT, _Traits>& std::basic_ostream<_CharT, _Traits>::operator<<(unsigned int) [with _CharT = char, _Traits = std::char_traits] /usr/include/c++/4.2.1/ostream:204: note: std::basic_ostream<_CharT, _Traits>& std::basic_ostream<_CharT, _Traits>::operator<<(long long int) [with _CharT = char, _Traits = std::char_traits] /usr/include/c++/4.2.1/ostream:208: note: std::basic_ostream<_CharT, _Traits>& std::basic_ostream<_CharT, _Traits>::operator<<(long long unsigned int) [with _CharT = char, _Traits = std::char_traits] /usr/include/c++/4.2.1/ostream:213: note: std::basic_ostream<_CharT, _Traits>& std::basic_ostream<_CharT, _Traits>::operator<<(double) [with _CharT = char, _Traits = std::char_traits] /usr/include/c++/4.2.1/ostream:217: note: std::basic_ostream<_CharT, _Traits>& std::basic_ostream<_CharT, _Traits>::operator<<(float) [with _CharT = char, _Traits = std::char_traits] /usr/include/c++/4.2.1/ostream:225: note: std::basic_ostream<_CharT, _Traits>& std::basic_ostream<_CharT, _Traits>::operator<<(long double) [with _CharT = char, _Traits = std::char_traits] /usr/include/c++/4.2.1/ostream:229: note: std::basic_ostream<_CharT, _Traits>& std::basic_ostream<_CharT, _Traits>::operator<<(const void*) [with _CharT = char, _Traits = std::char_traits] /usr/include/c++/4.2.1/bits/ostream.tcc:120: note: std::basic_ostream<_CharT, _Traits>& std::basic_ostream<_CharT, _Traits>::operator<<(std::basic_streambuf<_CharT, _Traits>*) [with _CharT = char, _Traits = std::char_traits]

share|improve this question
    
Maybe you should remove your java tag from this question as it has nothing to do with Java. –  Hovercraft Full Of Eels Feb 9 '12 at 2:36
2  
@HovercraftFullOfEels: He should also remove his [java] mindset. –  Xeo Feb 9 '12 at 2:42

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted
HeatingUnit heatingUnit;

should be:

HeatingUnit *heatingUnit;
            ^^

I believe your intention is to create a pointer of the type HeatingUnit since you use new inside the constructor. new is used to allocate memory on free store to pointer variables.

If creating a pointer is not your intention(I am not sure since you are migrating from java which doesn't have pointers), just use:

   HeatingUnit heatingUnit;

but do not use `new to allocate the memory in the constructor.

share|improve this answer

In C++ object are created without new unless you want to put them on the heap. To put them on the heap you'd need to use a pointer, e.g.

HeatingUnit* heatingUnit;

However, what you actually want is to initialize the object from the member initializer list:

BangBangControl(int tempToMaintain_, bool isOn, int initialTemp):
    heatingUnit(isOn, initialTemp),
    tempToMaintain(tempToMaintain_)
{
}
share|improve this answer
    
sweeet! what does the underscore in C++ do ("tempToMaintain_") –  user937897 Feb 9 '12 at 3:03
    
Well, I just attached the underscore to be sure that the names don't conflict. It isn't really necessary but I have to admit that I was unsure but just confirmed with a language expert sitting next to me (Richard Corden) that the first name refers to the member and the second to the name from the argument list if they are the same (i.e. you can safely remove the underscore). –  Dietmar Kühl Feb 9 '12 at 5:28

The variable declaration should be,

HeatingUnit *heatingUnit;

new HeatingUnit returns a pointer HeatingUnit* and to hold that you need a pointer.

For your information, here is another way (which has its limitation, but you feel somewhat like Java):

  private:
    HeatingUnit &heatingUnit;  // <--- declare reference
    int tempToMaintain;

  public:
    BangBangControl(int tempToMaintain, bool isOn, int initialTemp) :
    heatingUnit(*new HeatingUnit(isOn, initialTemp))
    {
      this -> tempToMaintain = tempToMaintain;
    }

Note that, we are defining heatingUnit in the initializer list of the constructor. You can do this for the tempMaintain as well.

Now heatingUnit can be used with . operator like Java instead of ->.

All these apart, in C++ you should use new only if you want to do it dynamically. In your specific case, HeatingUnit heatingUnit; would suffice, which declares an automatic object and doesn't require any deallocation manually.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks! this was very informative. –  user937897 Feb 9 '12 at 3:13

If you want to do:

heatingUnit= new HeatingUnit(isOn, initialTemp);

You have to change

HeatingUnit heatingUnit

to

HeatingUnit *heatingUnit

Why? Because in Java all objects can only hold references to objects by default, and to do that in C++ you have to declare it as a pointer, while in C++ objects can have sub-objects as fields (which can`t be done in Java).

Also, while in Java, initialization is done in the body of the constructor, it is good practice in C++ to use initialization lists.

BangBangControl(int tempToMaintain, bool isOn, int initialTemp)
: heatingUnit(new HeatingUnit(isOn, initialTemp)),
  tempToMaintain(tempToMaintain)
{ }

However, using new requires that you have to cleanup the memory yourself using delete so the following would be probably be preferable:

BangBangControl(int tempToMaintain, bool isOn, int initialTemp)
: heatingUnit(isOn, initialTemp),
  tempToMaintain(tempToMaintain)
{ }
share|improve this answer
    
when i use your technique i get "BangBangControl.cpp:18: error: member initializer expression list treated as compound expression BangBangControl.cpp:18: error: invalid conversion from ‘int’ to ‘HeatingUnit*’". Why is this happening? –  user937897 Feb 9 '12 at 3:35
    
@user937897: When using the first version (using new), declare HeatingUnit *heatingUnit with an asterisk, when using the second version (without new), declare Heating heatingUnit without the asterisk –  Jesse Good Feb 9 '12 at 3:39
    
sweet. your explanation was thorough and very helpful –  user937897 Feb 9 '12 at 3:48

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