Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I have this controller method:

public ActionResult Index(string searchError)
{
    // get all errors
    var viewModel = _errorsRepository.Errors.OrderByDescending(e => e.TimeUtc).
                            Select(e => new ErrorViewModel
                                            {
                                                ErrorId = e.ErrorId,
                                                Message = e.Message,
                                                TimeUtc = e.TimeUtc
                                            });

    if (!String.IsNullOrEmpty(searchError))
            viewModel = viewModel.Where(e => e.Message.ToLower().Contains(searchError.Trim().ToLower()));

    return View(viewModel);
}

I think doing the extra filter is slowing everything down, I was wondering if I can add the Where clause to the Select statement and check to see if searchError is null inline.

Is this possible?

share|improve this question
up vote 7 down vote accepted

Since Linq is lazy it does not matter if you have "one big statement" or multiple, as long as you don't execute your query (e.g. by iterating over the results or forcing eager execution using ToList()) there is no penalty since you are just chaining extension methods. In this regard I would focus on readability.

There are things to consider though, e.g. sorting cannot be lazy (you have to look at all items before you can spit out the items in order) - that's why you should always put your Where filter before your OrderBy so you have less items to sort. This said I would restructure your code like this:

// get all errors
var viewModel = _errorsRepository.Errors;

// optionally filter            
if (!String.IsNullOrEmpty(searchError))
{
    string searchErrorMatch = searchError.Trim().ToLower();
    viewModel = viewModel.Where(e => e.Message.ToLower().Contains(searchErrorMatch));
}

//order and project to ErrorViewModel
viewModel = viewModel.OrderByDescending(e => e.TimeUtc)
                     .Select(e => new ErrorViewModel
                      {
                          ErrorId = e.ErrorId,
                          Message = e.Message,
                          TimeUtc = e.TimeUtc
                      }).ToList();

Also note that I pulled out searchError.Trim().ToLower() out of your lambda and assigned it to a variable once - otherwise this is executed every time the lambda is evaluated, which is really unnecessary work.

Final edit: I also added a ToList() to execute the query after your projection - otherwise your query really would be executed from your view which in general is bad for many reasons, e.g. you have to keep the database context alive for a potentially much longer time and you are violating separation of concerns - views should only be concerned about the view model but have nothing to do with acquiring the data.

share|improve this answer
    
Dude, that's what I call a good answer. – ivowiblo Feb 9 '12 at 4:17

If you really want to build your query all at once without the if statement you could write it like this...

public ActionResult Index(string searchError)
{
    // get all errors
    var viewModel = _errorsRepository.Errors.OrderByDescending(e => e.TimeUtc)
        .Where(e => String.IsNullOrEmpty(searchError)
                    || e.Message.ToLower().Contains(searchError.Trim().ToLower())
        ).Select(
            e => new ErrorViewModel {
                ErrorId = e.ErrorId,
                Message = e.Message,
                TimeUtc = e.TimeUtc
            }
        );

    return View(viewModel);
}

...but then in the case where searchError is null or empty you've introduced that extra delegate that has to be called for every item in the result set. It's better to leave your code the way it is or, as BrokenGlass suggests, do your filtering first and then sort, project, etc. the items that remain. That's actually one of the really cool things about LINQ is being able to dynamically plug in the different methods and compose queries using only the pieces you actually need, and it's all lazily evaluated (as best it can)!

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.