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Language : C#

I use a backgroundworker to run my long job. I happen to see an exception, which I should ignore. When I handle the exception in the code block, it is not caught in the block itself. Instead it is caught , where I invoked backgroundworker's dowork.

Problem Situation

    Backgroundworker1_dowork()
    {
      try
       {
         fun1();
       }
      catch(Exception e)
       {
      console.writeline("bg block");
        }
    }
   void fun1()
   {
     try
        { 
            throw new exception("ex1");
        }
     catch(Exception ex)
       { 
           Console.writeline("code block");
       }
    }

   output: bg block Expected: code block

Can any one help me...

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2  
Not without being able to see what code is producing this behavior... – M.Babcock Feb 9 '12 at 4:43
1  
Please post example code. – Adam Robinson Feb 9 '12 at 4:44
    
I think it throws the exception in Backgroundworker1_dowork() before executing fun1() or skips fun1(). See the call stack of your exception – evpo Feb 9 '12 at 5:18
    
After adjusting the code above to build (dowork parms, etc), I'm consistently getting the expected result. Could you post a buildable failing example? – Ragoczy Feb 9 '12 at 15:26

The code that you provide will not compile, so it is hard to determine the problem. Yet, the call to fun1 is failing or the catch block in fun1 is failing.

I would put a Debug.WriteLine("In fun1"); before the try of fun1. If you do not see this in the output then you know the call to fun1 is failing. If you see this output, then you know the catch block is failing.

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