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So I'm working through some sample F# code, and ran into the following fragment:

let divRem a b = 
    let x = a / b
    let y = a % b
    (x,y)

When I try to compile it, I get the following error:

HelloWorld\Program.fs(15,14): error FS0071: Type constraint mismatch when applying the default type 'int * int' for a type inference variable. The type '(int * int)' does not support any operators named '/' Consider adding further type constraints

However, doing something like

let print n = System.Console.WriteLine(n.ToString())
print (4/2)

Results in

2

Why is the integer division operation not usable from within a function definition ?

EDIT: Here is an entire sample of the code that fails to compile.

let divRem a b = 
    let x = a / b
    let y = a % b
    (x,y)

let print n = System.Console.WriteLine(n.ToString())
print (divRem (5,3))
share|improve this question
    
Guessing by line numbers the actual error is when this function is used. please post your entire F# file which fails to compile –  John Palmer Feb 9 '12 at 5:18

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

The problem is you don't use comma's when calling functions in F#, commas are used to create tuples. The code should be:

let divRem a b = 
    let x = a / b
    let y = a % b
    (x,y)

let print n = System.Console.WriteLine(n.ToString())
print (divRem 5 3)
share|improve this answer
    
Actually these are round brackets, not commas, that designate the tuple here. The code compiles perfectly even if you use comma between 5 and 3, but leads to rather unexpected result. –  Alexander Galkin Feb 9 '12 at 11:22
3  
Commas create tuples, parentheses group things together to control the contents of the tuple. The code compiles if you place a comma between 3 and 5 because you create a tuple of (int -> int * int) * int, which is perfectly valid but probably not what you want. You can see this as when run the code with a comma between 3 and 5 is run you see (Program+clo@7, 3) printed to the console. –  Robert Feb 9 '12 at 12:01
let divRem (a, b) = 
    let x = a / b
    let y = a % b
    (x,y)

let print n = System.Console.WriteLine(n.ToString())
print (divRem (5,3))
share|improve this answer

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