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I am wondering if these two statements are equivalent in terms of performance:

Statement 1:

SELECT
    ISNULL(T2.COL4, T1.COL4)
FROM
    T1 LEFT JOIN T2 ON T1.COL1 = T2.COL1
    JOIN T3 ON T2.COL1 IS NULL AND T3.COL2 = T1.COL2 OR T3.COL2 = T2.COL2
WHERE
    T3.COL3 = @COL3

Statement 2:

SELECT
    T1.COL4
FROM
    (SELECT
        ISNULL (T2.COL4, T1.COL4) COL4,
        ISNULL (T2.COL2, T1.COL2) COL2
    FROM T1 LEFT JOIN T2 ON T1.COL1 = T2.COL1) T1
    JOIN T3 ON T1.COL2 = T3.COL2
WHERE
    T3.COL3 = @COL3

The two statements are functionnaly equivalent (aren't they?) but common sense would suggest the second statement is slower because we "enumerate" T1 LEFT JOIN T2 before applying the WHERE clause. But is it really slower or does SQL Server have a way to optimize them and make them equivalent?

The thing is the first way of writing it can get really nasty when you have several more columns from the left join to use, whereas the second way restrains the ugliness to the nested SELECT only.

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In both statements, the ISNULL(T2.COL1, T1.COL1) can be written simply as: T1.COL1 –  ypercube Feb 9 '12 at 7:02
    
That is correct! I oversimplified it when I wrote it. I edited my question and changed the column in the ISNULL statements. –  Evren Kuzucuoglu Feb 9 '12 at 7:20
    
You can also rewrite it as a UNION of two similar (but with simpler conditions) queries. –  ypercube Feb 9 '12 at 7:22

1 Answer 1

Another way to write the query would be a UNION of two subqueries with simpler Join condition and no use of ISNULL() function:

SELECT
    T2.COL4
FROM
    T1 
  JOIN T2 ON T1.COL1 = T2.COL1
  JOIN T3 ON T3.COL2 = T2.COL2
WHERE
    T3.COL3 = @COL3

UNION ALL

SELECT
    T1.COL4
FROM
    T1 
  LEFT JOIN T2 ON T1.COL1 = T2.COL1
  JOIN T3 ON T3.COL2 = T1.COL2 
WHERE
    T2.COL1 IS NULL
  AND
    T3.COL3 = @COL3
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