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I'm trying to pass two values on Button_Click Event

public MyClass()
{
    Int64 po = 123456;
    foreach (Expense expense in pr.Expenses)
    {
        Button btnExpenseDetail = new Button();
        btnExpenseDetail.Text = expense.ExpenseName;
        btnExpenseDetail.Location = new Point(startLocation.X + 410, startLocation.Y + (23 * 
        btnExpenseDetail.Click += (sender, e) => { MyHandler(sender, e, po , expense.ExpenseName); };            
        pnlProjectSummary_Expenses.Controls.Add(btnExpenseDetail);
    }
}  


void MyHandler(object sender, EventArgs e, string po, string category)
{
    FormExpenseDetails ed = new FormExpenseDetails(po, category);
    ed.Show();
}

I'm using visual studio 2010 c#. On the panel each Button's text values are all different. But the the buttons' Click_Events are acting all the same. Could someone tell me which part of code i am getting this logical error?

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Please don't prefix your titles with "C# " and such. That's what the tags are for. –  John Saunders Feb 9 '12 at 8:14

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Looks like a common pitfall with enumerators. Basically if you use the enumerator variable (expense in this case) for a lambda, it always creates a closure over the same variable, so it always uses the same value. You can fix it like this:

foreach (Expense expense in pr.Expenses)
{
    var currentExpense = expense; // <-- This should help. Also use this variable for the lambda.
    Button btnExpenseDetail = new Button();
    btnExpenseDetail.Text = currentExpense .ExpenseName;
    btnExpenseDetail.Location = new Point(startLocation.X + 410, startLocation.Y + (23 * 
    btnExpenseDetail.Click += (sender, e) => { MyHandler(sender, e, po , currentExpense.ExpenseName); };            
    pnlProjectSummary_Expenses.Controls.Add(btnExpenseDetail);
}

You can think of your lambda as being passed a reference to the variable expense. Even though the value of the variable changes with each iteration, the reference still points to the same variable. That is why it helps creating a locally scoped variable for each iteration (currentExpense). The string value and also the location are different because they are assigned to another location (Button.Text, Button.Location) each iteration.

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Works perfectly! Also thank you for the detailed and comprehensive explanation. –  SiHyung Lee Feb 9 '12 at 9:44

This code should work:

public MyClass()
{
    Int64 po = 123456;
    foreach (Expense expense in pr.Expenses)
    {
        var expenseName = expense.ExpenseName;
        Button btnExpenseDetail = new Button();
        btnExpenseDetail.Text = expense.ExpenseName;
        btnExpenseDetail.Location = new Point(startLocation.X + 410, startLocation.Y + (23 * 
        btnExpenseDetail.Click += (sender, e) => { MyHandler(sender, e, po, expenseName); };            
        pnlProjectSummary_Expenses.Controls.Add(btnExpenseDetail);
    }
}  


void MyHandler(object sender, EventArgs e, string po, string category)
{
    FormExpenseDetails ed = new FormExpenseDetails(po, category);
    ed.Show();
}

Lets go over something more basic.

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    var qs = new List<Action>();

    for (var i = 0; i < 10; i++)
        qs.Add(() => f("doer", i));

    for (var i = 0; i < 10; i++)
        qs[i]();

}

private static void f(string x, int y)
{
    Console.WriteLine("{0}: {1}", x, y);
}

When you run the code above you'll always get the output as: "doer: 10". Lets decompile that code:

private static void f(string x, int y)
{
    Console.WriteLine("{0}: {1}", x, y);
}

private static void Main(string[] args)
{
    List<Action> qs = new List<Action>();
    <>c__DisplayClass1 CS$<>8__locals2 = new <>c__DisplayClass1();
    CS$<>8__locals2.i = 0;
    while (CS$<>8__locals2.i < 10)
    {
        qs.Add(new Action(CS$<>8__locals2.<Main>b__0));
        CS$<>8__locals2.i++;
    }
    for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++)
    {
        qs[i]();
    }
}

[CompilerGenerated]
private sealed class <>c__DisplayClass1
{
    // Fields
    public int i;

    // Methods
    public void <Main>b__0()
    {
        Program.f("doer", this.i);
    }
}

As you can see, compiler was generated a class named c__DisplayClass1 and initialized it once before entering the loop. After that, it just incremented the i property of the variable CS$<>8__locals2.

So when i invoke theese lambdas on next loop, it uses the CS$<>8__locals2 object to look internal variables.

(My english is not good enaugh to explain it but it's all there...)

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This has to do with how C# <=4 deals with the foreach loop. Basically, the instance expense is defined outside the loop and then there is a interior loop which changes the pointer to the next item. Something like this pseudocode:

Expense expense;
for expense in pr.Expenses
   // do processing

If you think in terms of references, the value of the reference, expense is pointing to, changes during the iteration. So, by the time your click event fires, it's pointing at the last item. Now, this is supposed to get fixed in c# 5 and there was already a discussion here about this.

The fix is rather simple:

Int64 po = 123456;
foreach (Expense expense in pr.Expenses)
{
    var localExpense = expense;
    Button btnExpenseDetail = new Button();
    btnExpenseDetail.Text = expense.ExpenseName;
    btnExpenseDetail.Location = new Point(startLocation.X + 410, startLocation.Y + (23 * 
    btnExpenseDetail.Click += (sender, e) => { MyHandler(sender, e, po , localExpense.ExpenseName); };            
    pnlProjectSummary_Expenses.Controls.Add(btnExpenseDetail);
}
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