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In C#, Structs are managed in terms of values, and objects are in reference. From my understanding, when creating an instance of a class, the keyword new causes C# to use the class information to make the instance, as in below:

class MyClass
{
    ...
}
MyClass mc = new MyClass();

For struct, you're not creating an object but simply set a variable to a value:

struct MyStruct
{
    public string name;
}
MyStruct ms;
//MyStruct ms = new MyStruct();     
ms.name = "donkey";

What I do not understand is if declare variables by MyStruct ms = new MyStruct(), what is the keyword new here is doing to the statement? . If struct cannot be an object, what is the new here instantiating?

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2  
An instance of a struct is an object. The distinction you are probably misunderstanding is that between value types and reference types. –  Ed S. Feb 9 '12 at 8:40
    
but in C there is no object and struct is not an object. So in C# struct is implemented as object? –  KMC Feb 12 '12 at 8:15
1  
Thinking of C# in terms of C is not helpful. Ignore the syntactical differences, they are completely different languages. –  Ed S. Feb 12 '12 at 9:29
    
@KMC Even in C there is an object. You misunderstand what “object” means – understandable, since it means many different things in different contexts. In C++ (and I think C is similar) for instance it’s simply a space in memory: everything that resides in memory is an object. –  Konrad Rudolph Jun 9 '13 at 12:51
    
Related Answer: stackoverflow.com/a/3943596/380384. When not to initialize struct with new. –  ja72 Aug 22 at 14:51

5 Answers 5

up vote 25 down vote accepted

From struct (C# Reference) on MSDN:

When you create a struct object using the new operator, it gets created and the appropriate constructor is called. Unlike classes, structs can be instantiated without using the new operator. If you do not use new, the fields will remain unassigned and the object cannot be used until all of the fields are initialized.

To my understanding, you won't actually be able to use a struct properly without using new unless you make sure you initialise all the fields manually. If you use the new operator, the constructor will do this for you.

Hope that clears it up. If you need clarification on this let me know.


Edit

There's quite a long comment thread, so I thought I'd add a bit more here. I think the best way to understand it is to give it a go. Make a console project in Visual Studio called "StructTest" and copy the following code into it.

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;

namespace struct_test
{
    class Program
    {
        public struct Point
        {
            public int x, y;

            public Point(int x)
            {
                this.x = x;
                this.y = 5;
            }

            public Point(int x, int y)
            {
                this.x = x;
                this.y = y;
            }

            // It will break with this constructor. If uncommenting this one
            // comment out the other one with only one integer, otherwise it
            // will fail because you are overloading with duplicate parameter
            // types, rather than what I'm trying to demonstrate.
            /*public Point(int y)
            {
                this.y = y;
            }*/
        }

        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            // Declare an object:
            Point myPoint;
            //Point myPoint = new Point(10, 20);
            //Point myPoint = new Point(15);
            //Point myPoint = new Point();


            // Initialize:
            // Try not using any constructor but comment out one of these
            // and see what happens. (It should fail when you compile it)
            myPoint.x = 10;
            myPoint.y = 20;

            // Display results:
            Console.WriteLine("My Point:");
            Console.WriteLine("x = {0}, y = {1}", myPoint.x, myPoint.y);

            Console.ReadKey(true);
        }
    }
}

Play around with it. Remove the constructors and see what happens. Try using a constructor that only initialises one variable(I've commented one out... it won't compile). Try with and without the new keyword(I've commented out some examples, uncomment them and give them a try).

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"structs can be instantiated"? but struct cannot be an object, isn't it? Are the "fields" in the struct the properties and methods - if struct is not an object why does its fields need to be initialized? I think I need more clarification. thanks. –  KMC Feb 9 '12 at 8:34
    
Why wouldn't the struct's fields need to be initialised, if you don't call a constructor? If you don't initialise them, and you don't call a constructor to initialise them, they remain uninitialised. –  hvd Feb 9 '12 at 8:37
    
A struct is an object of sorts. Described on the Microsoft website as a "lightweight object." It can have variables, but not functions. A struct is sort of like a class, but all the members are public and you can't have any functions. It allows you to store information, but you can't manipulate or control that information like you can in a class. You could make a "new" struct to use the same variable but clear all the data. –  joshhendo Feb 9 '12 at 8:40
1  
@joshhendo: Huh? An instance of a struct is an object and they can certainly contain methods and private fields. You are confusing a beginner here. –  Ed S. Feb 9 '12 at 8:42
    
The terminology may be a bit confusing. Structs were originally around in C, which isn't an object orientated language. They still exist in C++ and other C-like languages (which C# is.) It may be better to think of a structure as a "record," or set of related variables grouped together. It's simply a condition of C# structs that all the variables inside a struct need to be initialised before the struct can be used. You can do that manually, or using the new operator. It may be better to think of structs as a "lightweight object." –  joshhendo Feb 9 '12 at 8:46

Catch Eric Lippert's excellent answer from this thread. To quote him:

When you "new" a value type, three things happen. First, the memory manager allocates space from short term storage. Second, the constructor is passed a reference to the short term storage location. After the constructor runs, the value that was in the short-term storage location is copied to the storage location for the value, wherever that happens to be. Remember, variables of value type store the actual value.

(Note that the compiler is allowed to optimize these three steps into one step if the compiler can determine that doing so never exposes a partially-constructed struct to user code. That is, the compiler can generate code that simply passes a reference to the final storage location to the constructor, thereby saving one allocation and one copy.)

(Making this answer since it really is one)

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It's worthwhile to note that because out parameters are a C# concept, rather than one used by the .NET Runtime, passing a partially-constructed struct as an out parameter to an external method will expose its values to outside code, even though the C# compiler will assume it won't. One could, for example, define a struct in such a way that myThing = newmyThing(5); will initialize one field of myThing while leaving the others unaffected. –  supercat Jun 9 '13 at 15:48
    
If someone can downvote Eric, that some statement. Well done.. –  nawfal Jun 17 '13 at 21:33
1  
I perceive that different language groups probably have their own vision of what .NET should be, and pretend that it fits their vision. For example, the C# group probably figures that .NET should have enforceable out parameters, and if everyone programmed in C# it would, but a virtual method with an out parameter will be regarded by other languages as a virtual method with a ref parameter. In some cases it's nice that languages aren't limited to the minimal subset of features that other language implementers may want to implement, but there are dangers too. –  supercat Jun 17 '13 at 22:02

Using "new MyStuct()" ensures that all fields are set to some value. In the case above, nothing is different. If instead of setting ms.name you where trying to read it, you would get a "Use of possible unassigned field 'name'" error in VS.

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Any time an object or struct comes into existence, all of its fields come into existence as well; if any of those fields are struct types, all nested fields come into existence as well. When an array is created, all of its elements come into existence (and, as above, if any of those elements are structs, the fields of those structs also come into existence). All of this occurs before any constructor code has a chance to run.

In .net, a struct constructor is effectively nothing more than a method which takes a struct as an 'out' parameter. In C#, an expression which calls a struct constructor will allocate a temporary struct instance, call the constructor on that, and then use that temporary instance as the value of the expression. Note that this is different from vb.net, where the generated code for a constructor will start by zeroing out all fields, but where the code from the caller will attempt to have the constructor operate directly upon the destination. For example: myStruct = new myStructType(whatever) in vb.net will clear myStruct before the first statement of the constructor executes; within the constructor, any writes to the object under construction will immediately operate upon myStruct.

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ValueType and structures are something special in C#. Here I'm showing you what happens when you new something.

Here we have the following

  • Code

    partial class TestClass {
        public static void NewLong() {
            var i=new long();
        }
    
        public static void NewMyLong() {
            var i=new MyLong();
        }
    
        public static void NewMyLongWithValue() {
            var i=new MyLong(1234);
        }
    
        public static void NewThatLong() {
            var i=new ThatLong();
        }
    }
    
    [StructLayout(LayoutKind.Sequential)]
    public partial struct MyLong {
        const int bits=8*sizeof(int);
    
        public static implicit operator int(MyLong x) {
            return (int)x.m_Low;
        }
    
        public static implicit operator long(MyLong x) {
            long y=x.m_Hi;
            return (y<<bits)|x.m_Low;
        }
    
        public static implicit operator MyLong(long x) {
            var y=default(MyLong);
            y.m_Low=(uint)x;
            y.m_Hi=(int)(x>>bits);
            return y;
        }
    
        public MyLong(long x) {
            this=x;
        }
    
        uint m_Low;
        int m_Hi;
    }
    
    public partial class ThatLong {
        const int bits=8*sizeof(int);
    
        public static implicit operator int(ThatLong x) {
            return (int)x.m_Low;
        }
    
        public static implicit operator long(ThatLong x) {
            long y=x.m_Hi;
            return (y<<bits)|x.m_Low;
        }
    
        public static implicit operator ThatLong(long x) {
            return new ThatLong(x);
        }
    
        public ThatLong(long x) {
            this.m_Low=(uint)x;
            this.m_Hi=(int)(x>>bits);
        }
    
        public ThatLong() {
            int i=0;
            var b=i is ValueType;
        }
    
        uint m_Low;
        int m_Hi;
    }
    

And the generated IL of the methods of the test class would be

  • IL

    // NewLong
    .method public hidebysig static 
        void NewLong () cil managed 
    {
        .maxstack 1
        .locals init (
            [0] int64 i
        )
    
        IL_0000: nop
        IL_0001: ldc.i4.0 // push 0 as int
        IL_0002: conv.i8  // convert the pushed value to long
        IL_0003: stloc.0  // pop it to the first local variable, that is, i
        IL_0004: ret
    } 
    
    // NewMyLong
    .method public hidebysig static 
        void NewMyLong () cil managed 
    {
        .maxstack 1
        .locals init (
            [0] valuetype MyLong i
        )
    
        IL_0000: nop
        IL_0001: ldloca.s i     // push address of i
        IL_0003: initobj MyLong // pop address of i and initialze as MyLong
        IL_0009: ret
    } 
    
    // NewMyLongWithValue 
    .method public hidebysig static 
        void NewMyLongWithValue () cil managed 
    {
        .maxstack 2
        .locals init (
            [0] valuetype MyLong i
        )
    
        IL_0000: nop
        IL_0001: ldloca.s i  // push address of i
        IL_0003: ldc.i4 1234 // push 1234 as int
        IL_0008: conv.i8     // convert the pushed value to long
    
        // call the constructor
        IL_0009: call instance void MyLong::.ctor(int64) 
    
        IL_000e: nop
        IL_000f: ret
    } 
    
    // NewThatLong
    .method public hidebysig static 
        void NewThatLong () cil managed 
    {
        // Method begins at RVA 0x33c8
        // Code size 8 (0x8)
        .maxstack 1
        .locals init (
            [0] class ThatLong i
        )
    
        IL_0000: nop
    
        // new by calling the constructor and push it's reference
        IL_0001: newobj instance void ThatLong::.ctor() 
    
        // pop it to the first local variable, that is, i
        IL_0006: stloc.0
    
        IL_0007: ret
    } 
    

The behaviour of the methods are commented in the IL code. And you might want to take a look of OpCodes.Initobj and OpCodes.Newobj. The value type is usually initialized with OpCodes.Initobj, but as MSDN says OpCodes.Newobj would also be used.

  • description in OpCodes.Newobj

    Value types are not usually created using newobj. They are usually allocated either as arguments or local variables, using newarr (for zero-based, one-dimensional arrays), or as fields of objects. Once allocated, they are initialized using Initobj. However, the newobj instruction can be used to create a new instance of a value type on the stack, that can then be passed as an argument, stored in a local, and so on.

For each value type which is numeric, from byte to double, has a defined op-code. Although they are declared as struct, there's some difference in the generated IL as shown.

Here are two more things to mention:

  1. ValueType itself is declared a abstract class

    That is, you cannot new it directly.

  2. structs cannot contain explicit parameterless constructors

    That is, when you new a struct, you would fall into the case above of either NewMyLong or NewMyLongWithValue.

To summarize, new for the value types and structures are for the consistency of the language concept.

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