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How do you add a column, with a default value, to an existing table in SQL Server 2000/SQL Server 2005?

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14 Answers

up vote 1057 down vote accepted
ALTER TABLE {TABLENAME} 
ADD {COLUMNNAME} {TYPE} {NULL|NOT NULL} 
CONSTRAINT {CONSTRAINT_NAME} DEFAULT {DEFAULT_VALUE}
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85  
Keep in mind that if the column is nullable, then null will be the value used for existing rows. –  Richard Collette Jan 31 '12 at 15:43
1  
@RichardCollette what is nullable column. If my data type is int or varchar, it always takes null value for the existing rows even if I specify a default value. Does that mean the default value goes towards new records only? –  Nick Feb 3 '12 at 15:04
2  
@Thecrocodilehunter Nullable column means that you can insert Null for the columns value. If it's not a nullable column, you have to insert some value of that data type. So, for existing records, Null will be inserted in them and in new records, your default value will be inserted unless otherwise specified. Make sense? –  Yatrix Feb 29 '12 at 16:42
11  
I like this answer a little better than dbugger's because it explicitly names the default constraint. A default constraint is still created using dbugger's syntax, except its name is auto-generated. Knowing the exact name is handy when writing DROP-CREATE scripts. –  Walter Stabosz Mar 23 '12 at 12:43
3  
@Vertigo That is ONLY true if the column is NOT NULL. Please try this: create table blah(a int not null primary key clustered); insert blah values (1), (2); alter table blah add b int null constraint df_blah_b default (0); select * from blah; You will see 2 NULL values for column b. –  ErikE Jun 14 '13 at 22:19
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ALTER TABLE Protocols
ADD ProtocolTypeID int NOT NULL DEFAULT(1)
GO
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The problem with that answer is that the default value is only valid for new records. Existing records will still have NULL value. –  Roee Gavirel Nov 9 '11 at 10:22
58  
You will find that is not the case. Otherwise the constraint would be violated. –  dbugger Nov 9 '11 at 16:50
12  
Columns in existing rows are filled with the default value. A little empirical test will prove it. –  dbugger Nov 9 '11 at 16:57
20  
Just to clarify - if "NOT NULL" is omitted from the command, the value for existing rows will NOT be updated and will remain NULL. If "NOT NULL" is included in the command, the value for existing rows WILL be updated to match the default. –  Stack Man Aug 14 '12 at 22:11
2  
For multiple columns ALTER TABLE table_1 ADD col_1 int NOT NULL DEFAULT(1), col_2 int NULL –  aads Sep 4 '13 at 5:25
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Beware when the column you are adding has a NOT NULL constraint, yet does not have a DEFAULT constraint (value). The ALTER TABLE statement will fail in that case if the table has any rows in it. The solution is to either remove the NOT NULL constraint from the new column, or provide a DEFAULT constraint for it.

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ALTER TABLE <table name> 
ADD <new column name> <data type> NOT NULL
GO
ALTER TABLE <table name> 
ADD CONSTRAINT <constraint name> DEFAULT <default value> FOR <new column name>
GO
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ALTER TABLE MYTABLE ADD MYNEWCOLUMN VARCHAR(200) DEFAULT 'SNUGGLES'
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"SNUGGLES"....???? hehehe. What kind of database to you operate?? ;-) –  Spudley Aug 5 '12 at 15:05
    
this add null!has to be not null before –  baaroz Sep 17 '13 at 19:55
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WITH VALUES handles the NOT NULL part...

ALTER TABLE table
ADD column BIT NOT NULL  
CONSTRAINT Constraint_name DEFAULT 0 WITH VALUES
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This is a key point. It's easy to assume a column with a DEFAULT constraint will always have a value - that is, not be NULL, even though NOT NULL isn't specified. –  Bill Brinkley Nov 27 '12 at 19:29
    
This answer would make more sense if the BIT column was nullable. As it is, the WITH VALUES clause is superfluous. –  rsenna Feb 18 at 18:35
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The most basic version with two lines only

ALTER TABLE MyTable
ADD MyNewColumn INT NOT NULL DEFAULT 0
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-- add a column with a default DateTime
-- to capture when each record is added.

ALTER TABLE myHappyTableName  
ADD RecordAddedDate smalldatetime NULL DEFAULT(GetDate())  
GO 
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ALTER TABLE {TABLENAME} 
ADD {COLUMNNAME} {TYPE} {NULL|NOT NULL} 
CONSTRAINT {CONSTRAINT_NAME} DEFAULT {DEFAULT_VALUE}

Link: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa275462%28v=sql.80%29.aspx

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ALTER TABLE ADD ColumnName {Column_Type} Constraint

The MSDN article ALTER TABLE (Transact-SQL) has all of the alter table syntax.

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You can do the thing with T-SQL by following way.

ALTER TABLE {TABLENAME} 
ADD {COLUMNNAME} {TYPE} {NULL|NOT NULL} 
CONSTRAINT {CONSTRAINT_NAME} DEFAULT {DEFAULT_VALUE}

As well as you can use SQL Server Management Studio also by right clicking table in Design menu setting default value to table.

And futher more if you want to add same column(if not exists) to all tables in databse then use.

USE AdventureWorks;
EXEC sp_msforeachtable 
'PRINT ''ALTER TABLE ? ADD Date_Created DATETIME DEFAULT GETDATE();''' ;
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Using 2008R2 I went to the design mode in a test db and added my two columns using the designer and made the settings with the gui then, the infamous right-click gives the option "Generate Change Script"! Bang up pops a little window with you guessed it, the properly formatted guaranteed to work change script. Hit the easy button.

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Alternatively you can add a default without having to explicitly name the constraint.

ALTER TABLE [schema].[tablename] ADD  DEFAULT ((0)) FOR [columnname]

If you have an issue with existing default constraints when creating this constraint then they can be removed by.

alter table [schema].[tablename] drop constraint [constraintname]
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example

ALTER TABLE [Employees] ADD Seniority int not null default 0 GO
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protected by Martin Smith Aug 23 '13 at 7:44

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