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I would like to have a function pointer to an Eigen matrix's operator() function. In particular, the operator() Eigen's VectorXi matrix class, which takes a single index. I.e. the operator I'm using when I call:

VectorXi V(1);
...
VectorXi::Index i = 0;
VectorXi::Scalar& vi = V(i); // <-- this one

What I've tried is:

VectorXi::Scalar& (*value_at_i)(VectorXi::Index i ) = &VectorXi::operator();

But this gives me the very long error:

...: error: no matches converting function ‘operator()’ to type ‘int& (*)(Eigen::DenseIndex)’
/usr/local/include/eigen3/Eigen/src/Core/DenseCoeffsBase.h:124: error: candidates are: typename Eigen::internal::conditional<(bool)((Eigen::internal::traits<T>::Flags & Eigen::LvalueBit)), const typename Eigen::internal::traits<T>::Scalar&, typename Eigen::internal::conditional<Eigen::internal::is_arithmetic<typename Eigen::internal::traits<T>::Scalar>::value, typename Eigen::internal::traits<T>::Scalar, const typename Eigen::internal::traits<T>::Scalar>::type>::type Eigen::DenseCoeffsBase<Derived, 0>::operator()(typename Eigen::internal::traits<T>::Index, typename Eigen::internal::traits<T>::Index) const [with Derived = Eigen::Matrix<int, -0x00000000000000001, 1, 0, -0x00000000000000001, 1>]
/usr/local/include/eigen3/Eigen/src/Core/DenseCoeffsBase.h:184: error:                 typename Eigen::internal::conditional<(bool)((Eigen::internal::traits<T>::Flags & Eigen::LvalueBit)), const typename Eigen::internal::traits<T>::Scalar&, typename Eigen::internal::conditional<Eigen::internal::is_arithmetic<typename Eigen::internal::traits<T>::Scalar>::value, typename Eigen::internal::traits<T>::Scalar, const typename Eigen::internal::traits<T>::Scalar>::type>::type Eigen::DenseCoeffsBase<Derived, 0>::operator()(typename Eigen::internal::traits<T>::Index) const [with Derived = Eigen::Matrix<int, -0x00000000000000001, 1, 0, -0x00000000000000001, 1>]
/usr/local/include/eigen3/Eigen/src/Core/DenseCoeffsBase.h:405: error:                 typename Eigen::internal::traits<T>::Scalar& Eigen::DenseCoeffsBase<Derived, 1>::operator()(typename Eigen::internal::traits<T>::Index) [with Derived = Eigen::Matrix<int, -0x00000000000000001, 1, 0, -0x00000000000000001, 1>]
/usr/local/include/eigen3/Eigen/src/Core/DenseCoeffsBase.h:347: error:                 typename Eigen::internal::traits<T>::Scalar& Eigen::DenseCoeffsBase<Derived, 1>::operator()(typename Eigen::internal::traits<T>::Index, typename Eigen::internal::traits<T>::Index) [with Derived = Eigen::Matrix<int, -0x00000000000000001, 1, 0, -0x00000000000000001, 1>]

What is the correct way to get a function pointer to this operator?

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Out of curiosity, why are you trying to do this? –  cmannett85 Feb 9 '12 at 9:48
    
I have a matrix of ints T. And an "map" vector IM, which takes a value that might occur in T and maps it to a new value. I would like to map all values in T via IM with a one-liner. Something like: T.unaryExpr(ptr_fun(bind1st(mem_fun(get_value,&IM)))); –  mangledorf Feb 9 '12 at 9:50
    
The simple solution is of course a trivial wrapper VectorXi::Scalar& value_at_i(VectorXi const& v, VectorXi::Index i ) { return v(i); } –  MSalters Feb 10 '12 at 9:04

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Just to make it a bit more explicit and because I was curious ... following the answer by rasmus, I tried the following code and it compiles and does what you seem to want.

VectorXi T(5); T << 2,1,0,2,1; 
VectorXi IM(4); IM << 10,20,30,40; 
// IM maps 0 to 10, 1 to 20, 2 to 30 and 3 to 40

VectorXi::Scalar& (VectorXi::*get_value)(VectorXi::Index) = &VectorXi::operator();
VectorXi res = T.unaryExpr(bind1st(mem_fun(get_value), &IM));
// res is now 30, 20, 10, 30, 20
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You cannot create a function pointer to a member function. C++ has support for pointer to member function but it is probably not what you want. The convention is to pass a functor instead of a function. A functor is a class with the operator () implemented. This is exactly what you have in your class, so just pass the original class as the functor.

EDIT: Below is an example of pointer to member functions in C++ on the () operator of a class T.

void (T::*op)(int) = &T::operator();
T t;
(t.*op)(5);
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" C++ has support for pointer to member function but it is probably not what you want." I think this is what I want. Is it possible to get it for the above? –  mangledorf Feb 9 '12 at 11:26
    
Have a look at the edited answer. –  rasmus Feb 9 '12 at 13:21
    
-1. A PMF is definitely the intent of the question. The problem in the question is about overload resolution failing. This is addressed in para 13.4 of the standard. –  MSalters Feb 9 '12 at 14:04
    
I disagree. He is trying to create a normal function pointer from the operator. The problem he shows is not due to overloading. –  rasmus Feb 9 '12 at 15:45
    
There's indeed the problem that he does try to assign a PMF (&VectorXi::operator()) to a regular function pointer. –  MSalters Feb 10 '12 at 9:12

The solution is to indicate the correct overload. What you're seeing is the overload resolution failing. There are 4 candidates, and none match the signature of value_at_i.

You alomst certainly want Eigen::internal::traits<T>::Scalar& Eigen::DenseCoeffsBase<Derived, 1>::operator()(typename Eigen::internal::traits<T>::Index) [with Derived = Eigen::Matrix<int, -0x00000000000000001, 1, 0, -0x00000000000000001, 1>].

That's a nasty signature. However, please note that there are three important parts:

  • Return type Eigen::internal::traits<T>::Scalar&
  • Class type Eigen::DenseCoeffsBase<Derived, 1>
  • Argument type Eigen::internal::traits<T>::Index

The relevant rule for overload selection in this case is quite specific: "The function selected is the one whose type is identical to the function type of the target type required in the context.". There's no adjustment done, and there's even a note (13.4/7) showing this.

Therefore my current assumption is that the problem lies in the class type Eigen::DenseCoeffsBase<Derived, 1>, which isn't VectorXi. The other two types are typedefs, which do not introduce new types.

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But how do I convert that signature into a cast/assignment like in the original post? –  mangledorf Feb 9 '12 at 16:33
    
There's no cast needed, just regular overload resolution. But you need to specify the type correctly for overload resolution to work. I don't see T in the compiler output so it's a bit of a guess, but I'd say VectorXi::Scalar& (VectorXi::*value_at_i)(VectorXi::Index i ) = &VectorXi::operator(); –  MSalters Feb 10 '12 at 9:14

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