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My MFC based application needs to send and receive XML based messages to and from another system. Now the client side communication is taken care of using the MSXML2::IXMLHTTPRequestPtr class. This allows to write the following code:

MSXML2::IXMLHTTPRequestPtr pHttpRequest;         // The HTTP Request object  
XmlDocument pXMLRequest;                         // The XML document contain 
HRESULT hResult;
hResult = pHttpRequest.CreateInstance("Msxml2.ServerXMLHTTP.3.0");
if ( FAILED(hResult) ) throw Error (hResult); 
pHttpRequest->open("POST", bURL,true);
pHttpRequest->send(pXMLRequest->xml);            // Send the XML request    
    while (pHttpRequest->GetreadyState() != 4)   // Just wait for the answer
     {                                           // (automatically on a 
     pHttpRequest->waitForResponse(10);          // separate thread so it 
     }                                           // does not block)

m_lHttpStatus = pHttpRequest->status;            //Read response and status
_bstr_t bsResponse = pHttpRequest->responseText; //responsetext contains the XML

Fairly straightforward, and works fine. But the system on the other side needs to be able to do the same, so my program will have to act as a server. And there seems to be no 'XMLServer' object in MSXML.
Now I could just fall back to raw sockets programming. Create a listening socket, and when receiving data try to parse the XML in the message. But that does not seem to be very efficient, certainly not compared to the ease of use of the HttpRequest object.
Actually I think that I would like start the HttpRequest without sending any data and than let it wait indefinitely for a response. So than the 'response' would actually be a request from the other system. But the waitForResponse() only works after a send(). And a send() always sends the Http Request message...

So what would be the best way to implement client and server behaviour in one MFC program ?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

HTTP is a client/server framework. You need to have an HTTP server at one end, and XMLHTTP object only implements the client.

Yes, it's very easy to use, but really what you want is something like either DCOM or TCP/IP sockets.

Failing that you could create a minimal HTTP 1.0 server - it is not hard. Either that or you need a server in your architecture. You can make one very easily using ASP or ASP.Net, as well as a million other ways. But I can't help thinking that you want something more like DCOM.

Bottom line: You need to decide the pattern of communication before you decide the method. How are your programs going to locate each other to begin talking for example?

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I know I could do this in ASP or ASP.NET, but I'm stuck to the MFC framework since that is what the rest of the software is created in. And the XML based protocol is also fixed, so DCOM is not an option.I'm just looking for the fastest and easiest way to get a client/server structure in MFC. Bottom line answer: Both programs will know where to connect because the URL of the other is entered manually. Also they both provide a 'ping' service, which basically mean if they receive a HTTP Request directed to the ping service they will simply echo the content of the request –  Cees Meijer Feb 9 '12 at 20:57
    
You have to implement an HTTP server then. It's not hard - just read everything up to the blank line. If POST then read the Content-Length header and read that many extra bytes for the body of the request. microsoft.com/msj/archive/S25F.aspx developers.sun.com/mobility/midp/ttips/HTTPPost –  Ben Feb 9 '12 at 23:10
    
Thanks for the link. This is the route I've been going now. But I still hope someone knows a trick to make the MSXML objects to work for me... –  Cees Meijer Feb 10 '12 at 19:45
    
@CeesMeijer there is no trick, it is a client-server system. XMLHTTP is just a client. You need both. –  Ben Feb 10 '12 at 21:26
    
I surrender... Back to just plain hard work then..;-) –  Cees Meijer Feb 12 '12 at 21:12

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