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I usually create parameterized queries in order to avoid SQL Injection attacks. However, I have this particular situation where I haven't been totally able to do it:

public DataSet getLiveAccountingDSByParameterAndValue(string parameter, string value)
{
    string sql = "select table_ref as Source, method as Method, sip_code as Code, " +
        " from view_accountandmissed " +
        " where " + parameter + " like @value " +
        " order by time DESC ";
    MySqlCommand cmd = commonDA.createCommand(sql);
    cmd.Parameters.Add("@value", MySqlDbType.String);
    cmd.Parameters["@value"].Value = "%" + value + "%";

    MySqlDataAdapter objDA = commonDA.createDataAdapter(cmd);
    DataSet objDS = new DataSet();
    objDA.Fill(objDS);
    return objDS;
}

As you can see, I am creating @value as a parameter but if I tried to do the same with parameter the query would fail.

So, is there a risk of SQL Injection with this query? Also, take into account that parameter is set by a DropDownList's SelectedValue (not a TextBox, so the input is limited). If so, how can I improve this query?

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2  
There's definitely a risk. Imagine some malicious user modifies your input form via some browser dev tool and enters something like 1=1; DROP TABLE important_table; ... as parameter value... –  Sergey Kudriavtsev Feb 9 '12 at 10:01
2  
With websites (as it's tagged asp.net) do not trust anything from a client as it can be modified with JS (including dropdown lists). –  Stuart Blackler Feb 9 '12 at 10:01
    
+1 for checking. There's definitely a SQL Injection risk with this. –  Curt Feb 9 '12 at 10:02
1  
ASP.NET checks if the items have changed when EnableEventValidation is set to true since 2.0. You would get an exception: "Invalid postback or callback argument". odetocode.com/blogs/scott/archive/2006/03/20/… –  Tim Schmelter Feb 9 '12 at 10:09

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Yes there is:

" where " + parameter + " like @value " +

The value in parameter is your risk. In the postback you should check if the selected value is in the set of start values of the dropdown list.

Make the parameter an enum and pass the enum to your function. That will eliminate the risk (something like: not tested):

public DataSet getLiveAccountingDSByParameterAndValue(ParameterEnum parameter, string value)
.....
    " where " + parameter.ToString() + " like @value " +

The ParameterEnum contains a list of all possible values in your dropdown list. In your code behind, parse the selected value to the enum.

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1  
Since 2.0 ASP.NET checks if the items have changed when EnableEventValidation is set to true. You would get an exception: "Invalid postback or callback argument". odetocode.com/blogs/scott/archive/2006/03/20/… –  Tim Schmelter Feb 9 '12 at 10:06
    
You are correct, by default. But if you are someone else does change the default, you would have a risk. –  peer Feb 9 '12 at 10:09
    
Yes, but i thought it is worth noting. Most times people complain about this feature and ask how to get rid of it, but here is a good example when it's useful. –  Tim Schmelter Feb 9 '12 at 10:11

So, is there a risk of SQL Injection with this query?

I think yes, it's vulnerable to SQL injection. For example, parameter = "1=1 OR value"

Also, take into account that parameter is set by a DropDownList's SelectedValue (not a TextBox, so the input is limited)

Doesn't really matter. A malicious user can inject any value on the executable itself or on the network packet (and thus send a value that doesn't exist on the DropDown).

If so, how can I improve this query?

You should check parameter argument and compare with DropDown values. For more generic data, I think there should be libraries that check such things (but I have no C# idea...).

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var columns = new [] {"column1", column2", ....};
if (!columns.Contains(parameter))
   return or do something else

EDIT
The only SQL injection risk is by passing the column name in the where clause using string concatenation. There is no other way. The truly shield is to check that the column name is a valid one, it exists in the table.
Even ASP .Net has event validation (checks that the posted value is one of the dropdowns), you can't base on this since this protection can be disabled.
The parameter used with like is not object to SQL injection

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How is this answering the question? –  m0skit0 Feb 9 '12 at 10:03
    
the column names are wellknown so check that the parameter is a valid column name –  Adrian Iftode Feb 9 '12 at 10:04
    
Still not good, because you might not want all columns to be accessed. And also you're using Contains, which allows stuff like "column1; DROP TABLE..." –  m0skit0 Feb 9 '12 at 10:08
    
are you sure Contains on an array works like this? –  Adrian Iftode Feb 9 '12 at 10:23
1  
no problem, thanks for the second thought –  Adrian Iftode Feb 9 '12 at 10:42

Since 2.0 ASP.NET automatically validates postback and callback arguments to see if they differ. So this is a good example when it's useful to EnableEventValidation.

http://odetocode.com/blogs/scott/archive/2006/03/20/asp-net-event-validation-and-invalid-callback-or-postback-argument.aspx

You'll get following exception then:

"Invalid postback or callback argument"

You could ensure that it's set to true by explicitely setting it in codebehind, for example in Page's Init event:

protected void Page_Init( object sender, EventArgs e )
{
    // don't remove this
    Page.EnableEventValidation = True;
}

Edit: Oops, actually this setting cannot be changed from codebehind, it compiles but throws following runtime error:

The 'EnableEventValidation' property can only be set in the page directive or in the configuration section.

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+1 for making us aware of this. Ironically, I used to complain about this property too. Still, I have given the right answer to @peer because I might have disabled the page event validation in some particular cases –  aleafonso Feb 9 '12 at 10:30
    
@aleafonso: Yes, therefore I've showed how to ensure that it's set to true for this page and will not be changed(even when someone sets EnableEventValidation=false in the page directive or in web.config). –  Tim Schmelter Feb 9 '12 at 10:35
    
I wish I could mark both answers as correct since both of them are right. Thanks a lot –  aleafonso Feb 9 '12 at 10:45

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