Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

Having the following code:

#include <iostream>

struct A
{
    int x;
    A(){}
    ~A(){std::cout <<"~A("<<x<<")\n";}
};
struct B: public A
{
};
void f(A a)
{
    a.x = 2;
}

void main()
{
    B b;
    std::cout <<"----------\n";
    b.x = 1;
    f(b);
    b.x = 3;
    std::cout <<"----------\n";
}

In this case the output is following:

----------
~A(2)
~A(1)
----------
~A(3)

The same code but virtual function is added to parent class:

#include <iostream>

struct A
{
    int x;
    A(){}
    ~A(){std::cout <<"~A("<<x<<")\n";}
    virtual void ff() {}
    A(A& ca): x(ca.x){}
};
struct B: public A
{
};
void f(A a)
{
    a.x = 2;
}

void main()
{
    B b;
    std::cout <<"----------\n";
    b.x = 1;
    f(b);
    b.x = 3;
    std::cout <<"----------\n";
}

In this case we have the following output:

----------
~A(2)
----------
~A(3)

EDIT:
Compiler is: MSVCPP 10


The questions are the following:

  1. Why we have double copying in the first case?
  2. Why we have only one copying in the second case?
  3. The 1st case: why does compiler not optimizes the 1st case (by reducing copy operations quantity)?
  4. Does the following code:

    void f(int);
    //...
    double d;
    f(d);
    

also make double-copying?

share|improve this question
    
Note in addition to the virtual function, A(A& ca): x(ca.x){} has also been added in the second example. – hmjd Feb 9 '12 at 11:00
    
It would help you to understand it better if you added cout statements to the DTOR of B and the CTORs of both. Print the addresses as well for extra info and insight. :) – Dennis Feb 9 '12 at 11:05
1  
What is your compiler? Do you compile with optimizations enabled? – R. Martinho Fernandes Feb 9 '12 at 11:09
    
@R.MartinhoFernandes: Exactly my Q.The output posted in the Q seems rather strange to me.I don't see where the extra copy in the first example is needed at all. – Alok Save Feb 9 '12 at 11:18
    
@R.MartinhoFernandes Als I've edited the initial post. My compiler is MSVC++ 10.0 – DaddyM Feb 9 '12 at 17:58
up vote 1 down vote accepted

The output on gcc 4.3.4 for both cases is:

----------
~A(2)
----------
~B
~A(3)

Example 1
Example 2

This output can be explained as:
When you call f(b); an copy of the object of type B is created since it is pass by value.
But there is Object slicing, since the function parameter takes on object of type A. Thus the object in the function now is of the type A and it gets destroyed while returning from the function resulting in call output ~A(2).

The following two traces are from the destruction of the object b which is created in the main(), Since it is of the type of B destructors for base class A and derived class B both are called for it.

I am not sure if I missed out any obvious optimization that gcc might be performing in this case but for me the outputs look pretty much as expected.

share|improve this answer
    
Note that only modification I made was of adding an additional trace to ~B() just for more clarity. – Alok Save Feb 9 '12 at 11:04
    
Thank you. But there is no answer on my issue where outputs are different :( – DaddyM Feb 9 '12 at 12:37
    
@DaddyM: Well you haven't provided the details asked by the users here about the compiler that you are using, Given that how do you expect us to help you? – Alok Save Feb 9 '12 at 16:28
    
FYI my post was edited 5 hours ago (added compiler version) while your comment was posted only 1 hour ago (at 10PM GMT+4). Please, re-read the initial post. I appreciate any help! – DaddyM Feb 9 '12 at 18:01
    
@DaddyM: FYI.The regular members(like me) answering Q's here, answer a lot of Q's everyday So do not expect them to re-visit and re-check each Q they answered for vital info that is expected to be there in the first place, Unless you explicitly write them a comment with the @ they wouldn't know & really wouldn't bother to check.I checked the behavior on msvc and it shows me the same behavior as mentioned in the Q.And I don't know the reason for it.Probably, looking in to the generated assembly code might help understand the reason. – Alok Save Feb 10 '12 at 4:41

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.