Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I have a working program that does some transforms but i'm quite afraid that, what will happen if the database it too bigger.

I'll make you clear like, if the below program bombs in the middle how would i get the program recover o get it working from the specified line of code.

Defenetely the process will get killed after executing a piece of code.

Will the program be able to continue back from where it got an error, or from the position were it got killed.

import sqlite3 as sqlite
import ConfigParser
config = ConfigParser.RawConfigParser()
config.read('removespecial.ini')

con = sqlite.connect('listofcomp.sqlite')
cur = con.cursor()

def transremovechars():
    char_cfg = open('specialchars.txt', 'r')        #Reads all the special chars to be           removed from specialchars.txt#
    special_chars = char_cfg.readline()
    char_cfg.close()
    cur.execute('select * from originallist')       
for row in cur:                                 #Applies transformation to remove chars for each row in a loop#
    company = row[0]
    for bad_char in special_chars:
            company =  company.replace(bad_char, '')
            cur.execute('Create table transform1 (Names Varchar, Transformtype Varchar')
            cur.execute('Insert into transform1 (Names)', company)


def transtolower():
    cur.execute('select * from transform1')         #Transformation to convert all the namesto lower cases#
    for row in cur:
        company = row[0]
        company = company.lower()
        cur.execute('Create table transform2 (Names Varchar, Transformtype Varchar')        #Creates another table named transform2#
        cur.execute('Insert into transform2 (Names)', company)                              #Copies all the lower cased names to transform2#



if __name__=="__main__":

transremovechars()
transtolower()  
share|improve this question
1  
Please fix your indentation, also. It's not correct. Please include the error message you actually get. –  S.Lott Feb 9 '12 at 10:53
1  
besides bad phrasing, bad indentation, you are creating a database table for each character you want to change in each result row - that can't be right: cur.execute('Create table transform1 (Names Varchar, Transformtype Varchar') –  jsbueno Feb 9 '12 at 11:15
1  
@S.Lott: Perhaps he is a twelve-year-old. –  Tim Pietzcker Feb 9 '12 at 11:18
    
@S.Lott you were right in guessing my age. I'll make you clear like, if the above program bombs in the middle how would i get the program recover from the specified line of code. –  Beginner Feb 9 '12 at 11:35

1 Answer 1

if the below program bombs in the middle how would i get the program recover o get it working from the specified line of code

You can't.

Your code is utterly mysterious because the create table will get an error prior to every insert except the first one.

If, however, you want to do a long series of inserts from one old table into one new table, and you're worried about the possibility that it doesn't finish correctly, you have two choices for maintaining the required state information.

  1. Unique Keys.

  2. Batches.

  3. Query.

Unique Keys.

If each row has a unique key, then some inserts will get an error because the row is a duplicate.

If the program "bombs", you just restart. You get a lot of duplicates (which you expected). This is not inefficient.

Batches.

Another technique we use is to query all the rows from the old table, and include a "batch" number that increments every 1000 rows. batch_number = row_count // 1000.

You create a "batch number" file with the number -1.

Your program starts, it reads the batch number. That's the last batch that was finished.

You read the source data until you get to the a batch number > the last one that finished.

You then do all the inserts from a batch.

When the batch number changes, do a commit, and write the batch number to a file. That way you can restart on any batch.

When restarting after a "bomb", you may get some duplicates from the partial batch (which you expected). This is not inefficient.

Query.

You can query before each insert to see if the row exists. This is inefficient.

If you don't have a unique key, then you must do a complex query to see if the row was created by a previous run of the program.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanx a lot ! Sire –  Beginner Feb 9 '12 at 11:56
1  
@Beginner: Please Do Not Use ! As Punctuation! Please Stop! It's Not Good English!! Except In A Comic Book!! Or a Cartoon!!! –  S.Lott Feb 9 '12 at 13:29

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.