Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I want to start some new threads each for one repeating operation. But when such an operation is already in progress, I want to discard the current task. In my scenario I need very current data only - dropped data is not an issue.

In the MSDN I found the Mutex class but as I understand it, it waits for its turn, blocking the current thread. Also I want to ask you: Does something exist in the .NET framework already, that does the following:

  1. Is some method M already being executed?
  2. If so, return (and let me increase some counter for statistics)
  3. If not, start method M in a new thread
share|improve this question
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 9 down vote accepted

The lock(someObject) statement, which you may have come across, is syntactic sugar around Monitor.Enter and Monitor.Exit.

However, if you use the monitor in this more verbose way, you can also use Monitor.TryEnter which allows you to check if you'll be able to get the lock - hence checking if someone else already has it and is executing code.

So instead of this:

var lockObject = new object(); 

lock(lockObject)
{
    // do some stuff
}

try this (option 1):

int _alreadyBeingExecutedCounter;
var lockObject = new object();

if (Monitor.TryEnter(lockObject))
{
   // you'll only end up here if you got the lock when you tried to get it - otherwise you'll never execute this code.

    // do some stuff

    //call exit to release the lock
    Monitor.Exit(lockObject);
}
else
{
    // didn't get the lock - someone else was executing the code above - so I don't need to do any work!
   Interlocked.Increment(ref _alreadyBeingExecutedCounter);
}

(you'll probably want to put a try..finally in there to ensure the lock is released)

or dispense with the explicit lock althogether and do this

(option 2)

private int _inUseCount;

public void MyMethod()
{
    if (Interlocked.Increment(ref _inUseCount) == 1)
    {
        // do dome stuff    
    }
    Interlocked.Decrement(ref _inUseCount);
}

[Edit: in response to your question about this]

No - don't use this to lock on. Create a privately scoped object to act as your lock.

Otherwise you have this potential problem:

public class MyClassWithLockInside
{
    public void MethodThatTakesLock()
    {
        lock(this)
        {
            // do some work
        }
    }
 }

public class Consumer
{
    private static MyClassWithLockInside _instance = new MyClassWithLockInside();

    public void ThreadACallsThis()
    {
          lock(_instance)
          {
              // Having taken a lock on our instance of MyClassWithLockInside,
              // do something long running
              Thread.Sleep(6000);
           }
    }

    public void ThreadBCallsThis()
    {
         // If thread B calls this while thread A is still inside the lock above,
         // this method will block as it tries to get a lock on the same object
         // ["this" inside the class = _instance outside]
         _instance.MethodThatTakesLock();
    }  
}

In the above example, some external code has managed to disrupt the internal locking of our class just by taking out a lock on something that was externally accessible.

Much better to create a private object that you control, and that no-one outside your class has access to, to avoid these sort of problems; this includes not using this or the type itself typeof(MyClassWithLockInside) for locking.

share|improve this answer
    
Would this be a suitable lockObject? –  DerMike Feb 9 '12 at 11:22
2  
Why the downvote? –  Rob Levine Feb 9 '12 at 11:59
    
Accepted for option 2 –  DerMike Feb 9 '12 at 12:42
add comment

You might find some useful information on the following site (the PDf is also downlaodable - recently downloaded it myself). The Adavnced threading Suspend and Resume or Aborting chapters maybe what you are inetrested in.

share|improve this answer
    
I would read the whole article, i have found it indispensable, albahari.com/threading from the begining –  Robert Feb 9 '12 at 11:29
add comment

One option would be to work with a reentrancy sentinel:

You could define an int field (initialize with 0) and update it via Interlocked.Increment on entering the method and only proceed if it is 1. At the end just do a Interlocked.Decrement.

Another option:

From your description it seems that you have a Producer-Consumer-Scenario...

For this case it might be helpful to use something like BlockingCollection as it is thread-safe and mostly lock-free...

Another option would be to use ConcurrentQueue or ConcurrentStack...

share|improve this answer
    
Good point. Thank you. What would the taking side look like? –  DerMike Feb 9 '12 at 11:24
    
@DerMike I would give you an example but I would need more information... basically these collections have Try methods which don't block... please check also my update above regarding Interlocked usage... –  Yahia Feb 9 '12 at 11:50
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.