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This question already has an answer here:

How can I find out what the element is that a <script> sits in?
As an example, let's take this

<div>
 <script type="text/javascript">
  var time = new Date(), hrs = time.getHours(), min = time.getMinutes();
  document.write('It is '+hrs+":"+(min<10?'0':'')+min);
 </script>
</div>

Then if I want to change this to something more modern, how can I find out what element we're in?
So I want to write, for instance in jQuery

$(thisdiv).html('It is '+hrs+":"+(min<10?'0':'')+min);

but how do I get thisdiv?
Yes, I know, I can put an ID on it, but I have the feeling that wouldn't be necessary. The browser knows where we are, otherwise it couldn't even do the document.write!

So, suggestions? I searched, but couldn't find it. Is it so simple that I'm overlooking the obvious?

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marked as duplicate by Blazemonger javascript May 30 '14 at 17:38

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

up vote 15 down vote accepted

Script are executed in the order of appearance in the document. The contents of a script tag are evaluated on encounter, so, the last <script> element is always the current one.

Code:

<div>
  <script>
    var scriptTag = document.getElementsByTagName('script');
    scriptTag = scriptTag[scriptTag.length - 1];

    var parent = scriptTag.parentNode;
  </script>
</div>
share|improve this answer
    
+1, I can't believe I overlooked that rather fundamental concept :( – Danjah Feb 9 '12 at 11:35
    
+1, Elegant solution. – osahyoun Feb 9 '12 at 11:39
    
Thank you! I wasn't aware either that the latest script was the last in the list, during its execution, so this the solution I was looking for. And as a plus, it works on all browsers I tested on, even Netscape 6. (Yeah, I'm thorough like that.) – Mr Lister Feb 9 '12 at 12:58
    
Wow, good one, hadn't thought about that. – Alex Turpin Apr 24 '12 at 14:52
    
+1 Awesome! Thanks! – diosney Apr 24 '12 at 22:14

Firefox:

document.currentScript.parentElement

Chrome:

document.scripts.length
share|improve this answer
$('script#some_id').parent().html('blah blah');
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2  
Yes, I know, I can put an ID on it, but I have the feeling that wouldn't be necessary. – Didier Ghys Feb 9 '12 at 11:28
    
Mr Lister did mention not giving the script an id, previously on SO I was looking for a similar solution because I have many script els in a document which all required a knowledge of "where they are", the best I could come up with was setting a uniquely random var in the script block for identifying access within other scripts (stackoverflow.com/questions/3057628/…). So maybe id's are the way to go... eagerly watching your Q. – Danjah Feb 9 '12 at 11:31

Try this

<div id="mydiv">
 <script type="text/javascript">
  var time = new Date(), hrs = time.getHours(), min = time.getMinutes();
  document.getElementById('mydiv').innerHTML = 'It is '+hrs+":"+(min<10?'0':'')+min;
 </script>
</div>
share|improve this answer
1  
Yes, I know, I can put an ID on it, but I have the feeling that wouldn't be necessary. – Didier Ghys Feb 9 '12 at 11:28
    
oh sorry i had not got that statement, i think Mr Rob W is quite nearer to your solution – Mujtaba Haider Feb 9 '12 at 11:44

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