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i have a vector of vector "mydata". i want to iterate my data in negative direction. the iterator should be started from the middle to the beginning. i wish to use following way;

vector<vector<int> >::const_iterator points;
int i, k;

(lets assume k = 10)

for (i=k, points=mydata.begin()+k; i != -1; i--, points--){

     //do stuff
}

does this way is the proper way to iterate in backward? (I am using dev c++, so predicates and some modern commands cant be used.) Hope your suggestions to do this.

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1  
You should really really really upgrade to an up-to-date IDE and compiler. Dev-C++ was junk 5 years ago when it was last maintained. Today, it is obsolete junk. –  jalf Feb 9 '12 at 11:34
    
@jalf: ok. thanks. any free version plz. –  gnp Feb 9 '12 at 11:55
    
Which OS? On Windows, you might want to take a look at MS Visual C++ Express. If you want a cross-platform IDE, there's Code::Blocks or Eclipse or a handful of others. Take your pick, or just use Google. –  jalf Feb 9 '12 at 12:06
    
@jalf: yes. windows xp. thanks –  gnp Feb 9 '12 at 12:16
    
@jalf: You're half right - Dev-C++ is junk, but it is being maintained once more. –  Mac Feb 20 '12 at 0:07

4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Since it's vector, you dont need to use iterator at all:

for (int k = 4; k >= 0; k--)
{
    // do something with v[k]
}

Example:

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
using namespace std;

int main(int argc, char** argv)
{
    int arr[] = { 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 0 };
    vector<int> v(arr, arr + 10);

    for (int k = 4; k >= 0; k--)
    {
        cout << v[k] << endl;
    }
}

output:

5
4
3
2
1
share|improve this answer
    
thanks, go with ur way. –  gnp Feb 9 '12 at 11:54
    
Why downvote ?? –  LihO Feb 9 '12 at 12:18
    
[not my downvote] i is redundant, as you can just use v[k] instead of *(i+k). The question is about using iterators, but you use an index. –  MSalters Feb 9 '12 at 12:32
1  
@MSalters: Good note. He wanted to know how to iterate through vector backwards I guess. –  LihO Feb 9 '12 at 12:39

A possible solution using reverse_iterators vector::rbegin() and vector::rend():

#include <iostream> 
#include <vector> 

int main()
{
    std::vector<int> v;
    for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++)
    {
        v.push_back(i);
    }

    for (std::vector<int>::const_reverse_iterator it = v.rbegin()+(v.size()/2);
         it != v.rend();
         it++)
    {
        std::cout << *it << "\n";
    }

    return 0;
}
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You can use std::vector::const_reverse_iterator. Here's the example of how to iterate backwards through the vector, starting from the middle:

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
int main()
{
    std::vector<int> v;

    for(int i = 0; i< 10; i++)
        v.push_back(i);

    std::vector<int>::const_reverse_iterator it = v.rbegin() + 5;


    for(;it != v.rend(); it++)
    {
        std::cout << *it << std::endl;
    }

    return 0;
}

Output:

4 
3 
2 
1 
0
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There are roughly two nice solutions. Either you just write the loop:

vector<int>::const_iterator i = v.begin() + 4;
do {
  // stuff with *i
while (--i != v.begin());

or use reverse iterators and the standard STL algorithms:

std::for_each(v.rend()-4, v.rend(), &stuff);
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