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I am writing simple program in C and I can't see why:

printf("%d\n", 1 == 1 == 1);
printf("%d\n", 1 == 1);
printf("%d\n", 0 == 0 == 0);
printf("%d\n", 0 == 0);

Gives:

1
1
0
1

I'm used to Python so all this is new and strange to me.

(As an aside who was the inventor?)

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migrated from programmers.stackexchange.com Feb 9 '12 at 11:31

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Nothing strange here apart from the poorly parenthesised expressions. First law of programming - break the problem (in this case the expressions) down into bits that are small enough for you to understand. –  Ian Feb 9 '12 at 11:33
    
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dennis_Ritchie was the inventor –  jk. Feb 9 '12 at 11:39

3 Answers 3

I think C is for aliens, not humans.

Maybe. No human would write code as 1 == 1 == 1.

Anyway, what's going on here. The expression gets parsed AFAIK as (1 == 1) == 1, so it's a comparison of a result of another comparison with 1. Truth values are represented as integers in C; true is 1, false is 0. So 1 == 1 is 1 (true) and that is equal to 1.

With 0 == 0 == 0, it's similar:

(0 == 0) == 0
1 == 0 // 0 == 0 is true (1)
0 // 1 == 0 is false (0)
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It was just a test. I wanted to check if a == b == true (1). And I am a human... I think. –  marcinpz Feb 9 '12 at 11:50
1  
@Lundin You are confusing the syntactic concept of precedence with the dynamic concept of order of evaluation. The associativity of 1 == 1 == 1 is perfectly defined by e.g. C99 6.5.9:1. Undefined behavior is not involved. –  Pascal Cuoq Feb 9 '12 at 13:29
1  
@Lundin Here is a derivation of the AST (1 == 1) == 1 using the grammar of C99 6.5.9:1. E → E == R → (E == R) == R. How do you derive 1 == (1 == 1) in a way that is compatible with that grammar? PS: yes, you said "unspecified" and it is indeed quite different, sorry. –  Pascal Cuoq Feb 9 '12 at 14:49
1  
@Lundin On the same page as 6.5:3, as part of footnote 72, there is the sentence "Within each major subclause, the operators have the same precedence. Left- or right-associativity is indicated in each subclause by the syntax for the expressions discussed therein." –  Pascal Cuoq Feb 9 '12 at 15:03
1  
@Lundin That grammar indicates the left- or right-associativity of the operator == by only allowing you to derive the AST (1 == 1) == 1 from the concrete syntax 1 == 1 == 1. Please read footnote 72. Alternately, try and fail to derive 1 == (1 == 1) if that is more convincing for you. –  Pascal Cuoq Feb 9 '12 at 15:19

You need to understand

  1. Operator precedence (http://www.swansontec.com/sopc.html).
  2. That in C / C++ 0 is equivalent to false and any non zero integer is equivalent to true.
  3. The bool type is implicitly castable as an integer with 0 casting to false and 1 casting to true.

Thus 1 == 1 == 1 is evaluated as (1 == 1) == 1 --> true == 1 --> true. Whence printf("%d\n", 1 == 1 == 1) --> printf("%d\n", true) --> printf("%d\n", (int)true) --> printf("%d\n", 1) --> 1

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1  
Operator presedence has nothing to do with this question. 1 == 1 == 1 can be evaluated either as (1 == 1) == 1 or 1 == (1 == 1) and you cannot know which that applies. This is called "order of evaluation" and which one that applies is unspecified behavior. –  Lundin Feb 9 '12 at 12:02
4  
@Lundin Sorry to repeat myself, but you have it backwards. This example has everything to do with precedence and nothing to do with order of evaluation. –  Pascal Cuoq Feb 9 '12 at 13:33
1  
@Complicatedseebio How did you come to the conclusion that operator precedence matters in an expression that only uses one kind of operator, namely ==? If you look in the standard or one of the usual precedence tables, you will surely find the == operator at the very same line as the == operator... –  Lundin Feb 9 '12 at 14:32
2  
@Lundin You are completely wrong. –  The Mouth of a Cow Feb 9 '12 at 16:39

The result of the == operator is 1 if the two operands have the same value and 0 if the two values are different.

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