Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

weird problem...

Ive implemented covariance from example .

My target FW is 4.0.

How ever . I wanted to see if it fails on 3.5 /2 -> but it wont.

It cant be since covariance is from FW4.0.

enter image description here

After changing to 3.0 i Build and see : (+wont fail on runtime)

enter image description here

enter image description here

share|improve this question
    
Try using the framework 2.0 (3.5) version of the compiler, rather than the 4.0 compiler. –  Tetsujin no Oni Feb 9 '12 at 12:07
    
@TetsujinnoOni isnt changing target FW is like working in the specified target ? –  Royi Namir Feb 9 '12 at 12:08
    
The Common Language Runtime and the C# compiler (csc.exe) are two separate things. Covariance and Contravariance where introduced to the CLR at version 2.0. They were not introduced to C# until version 4. You are using Compiler 4 to build version 3 IL which is why it works. –  Myles McDonnell Feb 9 '12 at 12:30

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Covariance was supported in framework 3, but not implemented in the compiler. You are using compiler 4 targeting framework 3.

This is mentioned in an Eric Lippert blog post, I'll see if I can find it..

EDIT

To further clarify,: The Common Language Runtime and the C# compiler (csc.exe) are two separate things. Covariance and Contravariance where introduced to the CLR at version 2.0. They were not introduced to C# until version 4. You are using Compiler 4 to build version 3 IL which is why it works.

share|improve this answer
    
How can i make it fail ? –  Royi Namir Feb 9 '12 at 12:05
    
Use the .NET 3.0 or 3.5 compiler. –  Myles McDonnell Feb 9 '12 at 12:06
1  
no need to uninstall, frameworks can co-exist no problem. Just use the desired compiler from the command line, or use an earlier version of VS –  Myles McDonnell Feb 9 '12 at 12:08
3  
The blog post you're looking for is, oddly enough, this one: blogs.msdn.com/b/ericlippert/archive/2012/01/02/… –  Eric Lippert Feb 9 '12 at 14:44
2  
ha! yes, that one. Computer programming and humour, a tricky medley to pull off. –  Myles McDonnell Feb 9 '12 at 14:56

The CLR has supported covariant and contravariant generic type parameters since version 2.0. It is just the language C# that didn't provide any syntax for it until version 4.

share|improve this answer
    
I dont understand how it can be supported in fw2. from where i read it was introduced at 4. –  Royi Namir Feb 9 '12 at 12:13
    
All .NET Languages including C# get translated to the same intermediate Language, IL (which is something like the Assembler language of the CLR). Now IL supports many features (like covariance and contravariance), but not all languages provide syntax to use all of them. The syntax in C# to use this feature was added in version 4. –  Botz3000 Feb 9 '12 at 12:16
    
so there is no way for me to fail it ? ( even if i use csc.exe for 2.0 ?) as myles answer ? –  Royi Namir Feb 9 '12 at 12:18
    
You can use an older compiler as he said (either by commandline or by using an older version of VS), and it will fail because the old compiler won't recognize the new syntax. But still, you don't need to force it to fail, because if older projects reference your Dll, they will simply ignore the covariance/contravariance. From the CLI spec: "Languages not wishing to support variance can ignore the feature, and treat all generic types as nonvariant" –  Botz3000 Feb 9 '12 at 12:21

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.