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How do I write a function to split and return an array for a string with delimiters in the C programming language?

char* str = "JAN,FEB,MAR,APR,MAY,JUN,JUL,AUG,SEP,OCT,NOV,DEC";
str_split(str,',');
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13  
You can use the strtok function from the standard library to achieve the same thing. –  Daniel Kamil Kozar Feb 9 '12 at 12:08
    

6 Answers 6

up vote 30 down vote accepted

You can use the strtok() function to split a string (and specify the delimiter to use). Note that strtok() will modify the string passed into it. If the original string is required elsewhere make a copy of it and pass the copy to strtok().

EDIT:

Example (note it does not handle consecutive delimiters, "JAN,,,FEB,MAR" for example):

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <assert.h>

char** str_split(char* a_str, const char a_delim)
{
    char** result    = 0;
    size_t count     = 0;
    char* tmp        = a_str;
    char* last_comma = 0;
    char delim[2];
    delim[0] = a_delim;
    delim[1] = 0;

    /* Count how many elements will be extracted. */
    while (*tmp)
    {
        if (a_delim == *tmp)
        {
            count++;
            last_comma = tmp;
        }
        tmp++;
    }

    /* Add space for trailing token. */
    count += last_comma < (a_str + strlen(a_str) - 1);

    /* Add space for terminating null string so caller
       knows where the list of returned strings ends. */
    count++;

    result = malloc(sizeof(char*) * count);

    if (result)
    {
        size_t idx  = 0;
        char* token = strtok(a_str, delim);

        while (token)
        {
            assert(idx < count);
            *(result + idx++) = strdup(token);
            token = strtok(0, delim);
        }
        assert(idx == count - 1);
        *(result + idx) = 0;
    }

    return result;
}

int main()
{
    char months[] = "JAN,FEB,MAR,APR,MAY,JUN,JUL,AUG,SEP,OCT,NOV,DEC";
    char** tokens;

    printf("months=[%s]\n\n", months);

    tokens = str_split(months, ',');

    if (tokens)
    {
        int i;
        for (i = 0; *(tokens + i); i++)
        {
            printf("month=[%s]\n", *(tokens + i));
            free(*(tokens + i));
        }
        printf("\n");
        free(tokens);
    }

    return 0;
}

Output:

$ ./main.exe
months=[JAN,FEB,MAR,APR,MAY,JUN,JUL,AUG,SEP,OCT,NOV,DEC]

month=[JAN]
month=[FEB]
month=[MAR]
month=[APR]
month=[MAY]
month=[JUN]
month=[JUL]
month=[AUG]
month=[SEP]
month=[OCT]
month=[NOV]
month=[DEC]
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10  
Hi! the strtok is marked as obsoleted by strsep(3) in man page. –  osgx Jun 30 '12 at 8:27
1  
Hi. I think the function has hard coded "," as the separator: char* token = strtok(a_str, ","); –  SteveP Dec 20 '13 at 12:18
    
@SteveP, well spotted. That code has been there for months and nobody has noticed. Will fix it shortly. –  hmjd Dec 20 '13 at 13:27
1  
As this may be the canonical question/answer on Stack Overflow for this, aren't there some caveats with respect to multi-threading using strtok? –  Peter Mortensen Dec 29 '13 at 22:17

String tokenizer this code should put you in the right direction.

int main(void) {
  char st[] ="Where there is will, there is a way.";
  char *ch;
  clrscr();
  printf("Split \"%s\"\n", st);
  ch = strtok(st, " ");
  while (ch != NULL) {
  printf("%s\n", ch);
  ch = strtok(NULL, " ,");
  }
  getch();
  return 0;
}
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5  
void main() should be int main(void) ... you are returning 0 anyway –  another.anon.coward Feb 9 '12 at 12:13
3  
I copied the code. I wasn't going to write code when I know it is out in the wild already, should be enough for them to figure it out. –  thenetimp Feb 9 '12 at 12:22

Not tested, probably wrong, but should give you a good head-start at how it should work:

*char[] str_split(char* str, char delim) {

    int begin = 0;
    int end = 0;
    int j = 0;
    int i = 0;
    char *buf[NUM];

    while (i < strlen(str)) {

        if(*str == delim) {

            buf[j] = malloc(sizeof(char) * (end-begin));
            strncpy(buf[j], *(str + begin), (end-begin));
            begin = end;
            j++;

        }

        end++;
        i++;

    }

    return buf;

}
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3  
You like strlen() a lot! BTW: sizeof char==1; *(str + begin) should at least be str+begin. and your strncpy() fails to nul-terminate the resulting string. And you fail to increment str. –  wildplasser Feb 9 '12 at 14:09

In the above example, there would be a way to return an array of null terminated strings (like you want) in place in the string. It would not make it possible to pass a literal string though, as it would have to be modified by the function:

#include <stdlib.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>

char** str_split( char* str, char delim, int* numSplits )
{
    char** ret;
    int retLen;
    char* c;

    if ( ( str == NULL ) ||
        ( delim == '\0' ) )
    {
        /* Either of those will cause problems */
        ret = NULL;
        retLen = -1;
    }
    else
    {
        retLen = 0;
        c = str;

        /* Pre-calculate number of elements */
        do
        {
            if ( *c == delim )
            {
                retLen++;
            }

            c++;
        } while ( *c != '\0' );

        ret = malloc( ( retLen + 1 ) * sizeof( *ret ) );
        ret[retLen] = NULL;

        c = str;
        retLen = 1;
        ret[0] = str;

        do
        {
            if ( *c == delim )
            {
                ret[retLen++] = &c[1];
                *c = '\0';
            }

            c++;
        } while ( *c != '\0' );
    }

    if ( numSplits != NULL )
    {
        *numSplits = retLen;
    }

    return ret;
}

int main( int argc, char* argv[] )
{
    const char* str = "JAN,FEB,MAR,APR,MAY,JUN,JUL,AUG,SEP,OCT,NOV,DEC";

    char* strCpy;
    char** split;
    int num;
    int i;

    strCpy = malloc( strlen( str ) * sizeof( *strCpy ) );
    strcpy( strCpy, str );

    split = str_split( strCpy, ',', &num );

    if ( split == NULL )
    {
        puts( "str_split returned NULL" );
    }
    else
    {
        printf( "%i Results: \n", num );

        for ( i = 0; i < num; i++ )
        {
            puts( split[i] );
        }
    }

    free( split );
    free( strCpy );

    return 0;
}

There is probably a neater way to do it, but you get the idea.

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This function takes a char* string and splits it by the deliminator. There can be multiple deliminators in a row. Note that the function modifies the orignal string. You must make a copy of the original string first if you need the original to stay unaltered. This function doesn't use any cstring function calls so it might be a little faster than others. If you don't care about memory allocation, you can allocate sub_strings at the top of the function with size strlen(src_str)/2 and (like the c++ "version" mentioned) skip the bottom half of the function. If you do this, the function is reduced to O(N), but the memory optimized way shown below is O(2N).

The function:

char** str_split(char *src_str, const char deliminator, size_t &num_sub_str){
  //replace deliminator's with zeros and count how many
  //sub strings with length >= 1 exist
  num_sub_str = 0;
  char *src_str_tmp = src_str;
  bool found_delim = true;
  while(*src_str_tmp){
    if(*src_str_tmp == deliminator){
      *src_str_tmp = 0;
      found_delim = true;
    }
    else if(found_delim){ //found first character of a new string
      num_sub_str++;
      found_delim = false;
      //sub_str_vec.push_back(src_str_tmp); //for c++
    }
    src_str_tmp++;
  }
  printf("Start - found %d sub strings\n", num_sub_str);
  if(num_sub_str <= 0){
    printf("str_split() - no substrings were found\n");
    return(0);
  }

  //if you want to use a c++ vector and push onto it, the rest of this function
  //can be omitted (obviously modifying input parameters to take a vector, etc)

  char **sub_strings = (char **)malloc( (sizeof(char*) * num_sub_str) + 1);
  const char *src_str_terminator = src_str_tmp;
  src_str_tmp = src_str;
  bool found_null = true;
  size_t idx = 0;
  while(src_str_tmp < src_str_terminator){
    if(!*src_str_tmp) //found a NULL
      found_null = true;
    else if(found_null){
      sub_strings[idx++] = src_str_tmp;
      //printf("sub_string_%d: [%s]\n", idx-1, sub_strings[idx-1]);
      found_null = false;
    }
    src_str_tmp++;
  }
  sub_strings[num_sub_str] = NULL;

  return(sub_strings);
}

How to use it:

  char months[] = "JAN,FEB,MAR,APR,MAY,JUN,JUL,AUG,SEP,OCT,NOV,DEC";
  char *str = strdup(months);
  size_t num_sub_str;
  char **sub_strings = str_split(str, ',', num_sub_str);
  char *endptr;
  if(sub_strings){
    for(int i = 0; sub_strings[i]; i++)
      printf("[%s]\n", sub_strings[i]);
  }
  free(sub_strings);
  free(str);
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Method below will do all the job (memory allocation, counting the length) for you. More information and description can be found here - http://source-code-share.blogspot.com/2014/07/implementation-of-java-stringsplit.html

int split (const char *str, char c, char ***arr)
{
    int count = 1;
    int token_len = 1;
    int i = 0;
    char *p;
    char *t;

    p = str;
    while (*p != '\0')
    {
        if (*p == c)
            count++;
        p++;
    }

    *arr = (char**) malloc(sizeof(char*) * count);
    if (*arr == NULL)
        exit(1);

    p = str;
    while (*p != '\0')
    {
        if (*p == c)
        {
            (*arr)[i] = (char*) malloc( sizeof(char) * token_len );
            if ((*arr)[i] == NULL)
                exit(1);

            token_len = 0;
            i++;
        }
        p++;
        token_len++;
    }
    (*arr)[i] = (char*) malloc( sizeof(char) * token_len );
    if ((*arr)[i] == NULL)
        exit(1);

    i = 0;
    p = str;
    t = ((*arr)[i]);
    while (*p != '\0')
    {
        if (*p != c && *p != '\0')
        {
            *t = *p;
            t++;
        }
        else
        {
            *t = '\0';
            i++;
            t = ((*arr)[i]);
        }
        p++;
    }

    return count;
}

How to use it:

int main (int argc, char ** argv)
{
    int i;
    char *s = "Hello, this is a test module for the string splitting.";
    int c = 0;
    char **arr = NULL;

    c = split(s, ' ', &arr);

    printf("found %d tokens.\n", c);

    for (i = 0; i < c; i++)
        printf("string #%d: %s\n", i, arr[i]);

    return 0;
}
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