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#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#define MAX 10
void main()
{
int *ptr, *arr[MAX];
int i, j;
for (i=MAX-1; i>=0; i--)

if (arr[i]=(int*)malloc(i*sizeof(int)))  // <= that line!

for (j=0; j<i; j++)
*(*(arr+i)+j) = j*i;

ptr = *(arr+MAX-1);
while (*ptr)    
printf ("%d ", *ptr--);
}

I am not understand what the purpose of this command:

arr[i]=(int*)malloc(i*sizeof(int))

I know that this malloc dynamic allocation. But what is meant by arr[i] it gives the sizeof*i ? Thanks.

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Ehm, I'm assuming you tried to emphasize the if statement in your code? (using ** **) You might want to remove that. Edit: Thanks @NiklasB –  Bart Feb 9 '12 at 12:24
    
Yikes! Do you realize you have a single statement spanning 6 lines (2 of them empty) of your code? I suggest you break that statement into smaller statements. –  pmg Feb 9 '12 at 12:26
    
    
Remember to accept correct answers! –  rekire Mar 1 '12 at 8:12

5 Answers 5

The command that you are talking about allocates a block of length that is sufficient to store i items of type int, and stores the result at the i-th position in the array of pointers called arr. The program creates a "triangular" arr array: its elements are arrays of different lengths, arranged in such an order that arr[i] can hold i elements.

By the way, this code is missing calls to free for the items it has allocated.

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int *ptr, *arr[MAX]

creates a pointer to int and an array with MAX elements of pointers to int.

arr[i]=(int*)malloc(i*sizeof(int))

Allocates space for i ints for every int pointer.

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At first sizeof() "returns" (it should be replaced with numeric value during compilation) the size of provided type. Means 4 for int (8 on 64b machines), 1 for char and so on.

Therefore i*sizeof(int) means size for i ints (i = 4; sizeof( int) = 4; than it's 16).

malloc() uses number of bytes to allocate as parameter, therefore malloc(16) allocate 16bytes, enough space for 4 4B integers.

(int*) is just something like C-hack to have correct types (because you want to use those 16B as int[4] not as void *).

The whole code means to allocate space for i ints on i-th place of array (1 on first, 2 on second...). However I wander what will happen for 0, when you'll try to allocate 0 Bytes :)

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It's allocating increasingly longer arrays as each element of the arr. so arr[0] points to a 0 size array, arr[2] points to an array of 2 ints and so on.

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arr is an array of pointers to int. Every element of it - arr[x] - is a pointer to int, so an array. It's an array of arrays of ints.

For each element of the array, you create an array with size of the current index.

Note though that your code is illegal, since when i==0, you will call malloc(0).

Also, it's good practice not to cast the return type of malloc.

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