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I am currently exceeding the soft memory limit when I try to do simple writes to the Google App Engine blobstore. What is the proper way to write this code so that it does not leak memory?

from __future__ import with_statement
from google.appengine.api import files
from google.appengine.api import blobstore
def files_test(limit):
file_name = files.blobstore.create(mime_type='application/octet-stream') 
   try:
     with files.open(file_name, 'a') as f:
       for x in range(limit):
         f.write("Testing \n")

   finally:
     files.finalize(file_name)
     return files.blobstore.get_blob_key(file_name)

files_test(4000) produces the error:

Exceeded soft private memory limit with 157.578 MB after servicing 27 requests total

share|improve this question
    
for which value of limit are you exceeding the 128MB memory limit? –  proppy Feb 9 '12 at 12:38
    
4000 will usually do it. –  Chris Feb 9 '12 at 12:38
    
did you try to use code.google.com/p/apptrace? –  proppy Feb 9 '12 at 12:44
    
Are you seeing this on new instances or older instances that have served a lot of traffic? The error message in the logs should state how many requests were served. Also, what is the typical memory usage of your app (on the instances page)? I did not get a mem error, even with a list of 100000. –  Robert Kluin Feb 10 '12 at 7:36
    
Hi Robert, I import a file named backup and then run backup.files_test(2500) which passes. Then I can run backup.files_test(3000) and produce the soft memory error. "Exceeded soft private memory limit with 165.598 MB after servicing 22 requests total" If I run 2500 again, it will pass. Passing attempts usually take about 15 seconds while failing ones die around 20 seconds with the memory error. The issue is very reproducible. The method is exactly as shown above. I am running python 2.5 on app engine and I can also duplicate the error from the GAE console app. –  Chris Feb 10 '12 at 14:22

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Unfortunately python's garbage collector is not perfect. Every write you do creates lots of small objects (via protocol buffer creation) that is not collected by python on the fly for some reason. I found that in mapreduce library I have to do

import gc
gc.collect()

from time to time to keep garbage collector happy.

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A late addition to this question: writing such small strings to a file opened with files.open() is very inefficient -- if you use Appstats you'll see that each write() call is a separate RPC. You should do some kind of buffering. (The next answer is also mentioning this.) –  Guido van Rossum Mar 5 '12 at 4:41

Since it is Python 2.5, xrange should be better than range, isn't it?

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3  
Yes, but it hardly explains the out of memory warning. A list of 4000 integers is something like 4000 times 40 bytes, i.e. 160 KB. That may seem a lot but is a drop in the 128 MB bucket... –  Guido van Rossum Feb 10 '12 at 7:08

You should write all data at once to avoid problem and speed up - optimize it - it should stop problem but not solve bug -> http://docs.python.org/library/stringio.html. Consider that file.write could be not simple write but request to RPC API which is slow to setup - see SDK code - avoid multi calls/buffer.

With such small amount of data 4000*9 it should not occur - it looks like bug in Google API - just report it http://code.google.com/p/googleappengine/issues/list?can=2&q=&sort=-id&colspec=ID%20Type%20Component%20Status%20Stars%20Summary%20Language%20Priority%20Owner%20Log

Consider that 'create' is marked as experimental http://code.google.com/intl/pl/appengine/docs/python/blobstore/overview.html#Writing_Files_to_the_Blobstore

Fix also finalize bugs - not finalize invalid file or return result if exception!

import StringIO

from __future__ import with_statement
from google.appengine.api import files
from google.appengine.api import blobstore

def files_test(limit):
    output = StringIO.StringIO()

    # workaround!
    for x in range(limit):
        output.write("Testing \n")

    file_name = files.blobstore.create(mime_type='application/octet-stream') 
    try:
        with files.open(file_name, 'a') as f:
            # workaround!
            f.write(output.getvalue())

    finally:
        output.close()

    files.finalize(file_name)           
    return files.blobstore.get_blob_key(file_name)
share|improve this answer

Maybe I'm wrong, but I am quite sure that the number of calls to write() could be the problem here. I think that is the problem because I had a similar problem when I tried to save a file that was uploaded by a user.

For me this was causing the problem:

with files.open(file_name, 'a') as f:
    for chunk in read_in_chunks(data):
        f.write(chunk)    

For me the problem went away when i changed the chunk size to be 1Mb instead of 1Kb.

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