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I was reading through the boost documentation on tuples and came across the following valid tuple instantiation (A, B and C are some user defined classes):

tuple<A, int(*)(char, int), B(A::*)(C&), C>

I couldn't understand what the types of the 2nd and 3rd parameters were. What exactly are the int(*)(char, int) and B(A::*)(C&) types?

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2  
unixwiz.net/techtips/reading-cdecl.html That's for C; C++ adds pointer-to-member and template types but the idea stays. Have a read (but be aware that people don't use that in production code, there's typedef for simplifying such declarations). –  Kos Feb 9 '12 at 13:12

5 Answers 5

up vote 7 down vote accepted
int(*)(char, int)

Is a pointer to a function accepting a char and an int as parameter and returning an int.

B(A::*)(C&)

Is a pointer to a member function on an A object, returning B and accepting a reference to C as a parameter.

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Thanks, I had no idea what the second one meant. +1 –  Luchian Grigore Feb 9 '12 at 13:04

int(*)(char, int) is a pointer to a function that returns an int and takes a char and an int as parameters.

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int(*)(char, int)

A pointer to function taking (char, int) and returning int.

B(A::*)(C&)

A pointer to member function of A taking C& returning B.

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B(A::*)(C&) is a pointer to A's member function taking a C reference parameter and returning a B object.

Luchian already answered for int(*)(char, int).

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B(A::*)(C&)

is a pointer to member function ( member of A) that takes a C& and returns a B

Example:

class B{
public:
/*empty class*/
};
class A{
public:
 B DoSomething( C& input){
 return B;
}

}
int main(){
auto G = &A::DoSomething;
}

the type of G is B(A::*)(C&)

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