Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
 public class Demo {


public static void main(String args[])
{   
    double d = 12.345;

    System.out.printf("|%7.3f|\n",d);
}
}

Output is |12.345|

what does 7.3f indicates.I would also like to know others options that can be used with printf. If I use

   System.out.printf("|%5.3f|\n",d);

I get the same output?why?

share|improve this question
add comment

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Both specifiers (7.3 and 5.3) say "use 3 digits of precision". The difference between them is "min width 7" vs "min width 5". The output of both is a 6 char long string of digits and the decimal point that has 3 digits of precision.

The width specification is useful when the actual width of the data is less-than or equal-to the specified width. If the data requires more than the specified width to be displayed, then the width is ignored.

PrintStream

share|improve this answer
add comment

The string "%7.3f" indicates that you want to format d as a floating point number with at most seven characters, and three decimal points.

share|improve this answer
    
seven characters is including decimal pint and fraction.Can u explain –  prerna Feb 9 '12 at 13:59
    
Right, so the 7 tells the formatter that you want exactly 7 characters of "whitespace" to try to fill with non-blank characters. The f tells the formatter to expect floating point number, and the 3 tells the formatter how many decimal points to attempt to round to. –  asf107 Feb 9 '12 at 14:08
add comment
System.out.printf("|%2.3f|\n",d);
System.out.printf("|%2.2f|\n",d);
System.out.printf("|%2.1f|\n",d);

System.out.printf("|%6.3f|\n",d);
System.out.printf("|%7.3f|\n",d);
System.out.printf("|%8.3f|\n",d);

|12.345|
|12.35|
|12.3|
|12.345|
| 12.345|
| 12.345|

share|improve this answer
add comment

The official information source about standard Java classes and methods is the Javadoc:
Java SE API

First search for the System class in the left lower panel.
There (right panel) you find that out is an instance of PrintStream.
After clicking that link, you see the Javadoc for PrintStream where you find the documentation of printf.
These, at least, contains a link to the description for the Format string syntax.

(the Javadoc can also be download from Java SE Downloads)

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.