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I have a data access layer that use as Linq-To-SQL as ORM and uses the repository pattern.

For example

public class OrderRepository : IRepository<DTO.Order>
{
        DTO.SampleDataContext _db = null;

        public OrderRepository()
        {
            _db = DataContextFactory.Create();
        }

        public OrderRepository(DTO.SampleDataContext db)
        {
            _db = db;
        }

        public IQueryable<DTO.Order> SelectAll()
        {
            var q = from o in _db.Orders
                    select o;

            return q.AsQueryable();
        }

And my business layer works with result of SelectAll() method and query on it's results.

In SQL Profiler Linq-to-SQL generates a nested query, something like this

select * from f1
(
    select * from Orders
) as f1
where f1.RecordDateTime > @p1

Are there any performance issues with that approach?

thanks in advance

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Why do you need to call AsQueryable()? q will already be of type IQueryable<DTO.Order> anyway. –  Frank Tzanabetis Feb 10 '12 at 3:00

2 Answers 2

If you remove the call to AsQueryable() the sql generated will no longer be a nested query. Should look like this -

select * from Orders where f1.RecordDateTime > @p1
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I would actually recommend you not returning as IQueryable. Because if you then are planing to do anything more to your list that will result in a database call. For example:

var test=db.YourTable.Select (u => u);
var ls= test.Where (a =>a.SomeColumn>9 );
var ls2= test.Where (t =>t.SomeColumn>4);

test.ToList();
ls.ToList();
ls2.ToList();

When the three toList calls are made that will result in 3 database call. Database calls are in most cases more expensive then looping in memory. In you case i would recommend you doing something like this:

public List<DTO.Order> SelectAll()
{
      var q = from o in _db.Orders
              select o;

       return q.ToList();
}
public List<DTO.Order> GetByRecordeDate(DateTime recordDateTime)
{
    var q = from o in _db.Orders
            where o.RecordDateTime>recordDateTime
            select o;

    return q.ToList();
}

Or if you really want to do a implementation and use the IQueryable I would recommend you doing something like this:

private IQueryable<DTO.Order> SelectAll()
{
    var q = from o in _db.Orders
            select o;

    return q;
}
private List<DTO.Order> GetAll()
{
    return SelectAll().ToList();
}
public List<DTO.Order> GetByRecordeDate(DateTime recordDateTime)
{
    var q = from o in SelectAll()
            where o.RecordDateTime>recordDateTime
            select o;

    return q.ToList();
}
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