Dismiss
Announcing Stack Overflow Documentation

We started with Q&A. Technical documentation is next, and we need your help.

Whether you're a beginner or an experienced developer, you can contribute.

Sign up and start helping → Learn more about Documentation →

There is an online file (such as http://www.example.com/information.asp) I need to grab and save to a directory. I know there are several methods for grabbing and reading online files (URLs) line-by-line, but is there a way to just download and save the file using Java?

share|improve this question
    
related stackoverflow.com/questions/8324862/… – Adrien Be Jul 11 '13 at 7:00

12 Answers 12

up vote 399 down vote accepted

Give a try to Java NIO:

URL website = new URL("http://www.website.com/information.asp");
ReadableByteChannel rbc = Channels.newChannel(website.openStream());
FileOutputStream fos = new FileOutputStream("information.html");
fos.getChannel().transferFrom(rbc, 0, Long.MAX_VALUE);

Using transferFrom() is potentially much more efficient than a simple loop that reads from the source channel and writes to this channel. Many operating systems can transfer bytes directly from the source channel into the filesystem cache without actually copying them.

Check more about it here.

Note: The third parameter in transferFrom is the maximum number of bytes to transfer. Integer.MAX_VALUE will transfer at most 2^31 bytes, Long.MAX_VALUE will allow at most 2^63 bytes (larger than any file in existence).

share|improve this answer
6  
hey what is that shifty bit? – willcodejavaforfood May 28 '09 at 15:18
8  
@willcodejavaforfood: it is just an alias for 16777216. An arbitrary long block size. A magic costant (beware it!) – dfa May 28 '09 at 15:23
70  
This will only download the first 16MB of a file: stackoverflow.com/questions/8405062/downloading-files-with-java – Ben McCann Jan 12 '13 at 21:04
21  
@kirdie and if I want more than 8388608 TB? – Cruncher Oct 15 '13 at 14:02
14  
A single call isn't adequate. transferFrom() isnt' specified to complete the entire transfer in a single call. That's why it returns a count. You have to loop. – EJP Jul 23 '14 at 2:32

Use apache commons-io, just one line code:

FileUtils.copyURLToFile(URL, File)
share|improve this answer
13  
Nice! Just what I'm looking for! I knew Apache libraries would already cover this. BTW, it's recommended to use the overloaded version with timeout parameters! – Hendy Irawan Jan 23 '12 at 15:11
4  
...and when using that overloaded version, remember that the timeouts are specified in milliseconds, not seconds. – László van den Hoek Jul 6 '12 at 12:00
3  
Take note that copyURLToFile with timeout parameter is only available since version 2.0 of Commons IO library. See Java docs – Stanley Apr 12 '13 at 4:00
2  
This must be the accepted answer – Magno C Nov 25 '14 at 11:38
4  
what if basic authentication header has to be added to the request? is there a workaround? – Damian Apr 2 '15 at 14:30
public void saveUrl(final String filename, final String urlString)
        throws MalformedURLException, IOException {
    BufferedInputStream in = null;
    FileOutputStream fout = null;
    try {
        in = new BufferedInputStream(new URL(urlString).openStream());
        fout = new FileOutputStream(filename);

        final byte data[] = new byte[1024];
        int count;
        while ((count = in.read(data, 0, 1024)) != -1) {
            fout.write(data, 0, count);
        }
    } finally {
        if (in != null) {
            in.close();
        }
        if (fout != null) {
            fout.close();
        }
    }
}

You'll need to handle exceptions, probably external to this method.

share|improve this answer
5  
How to download very faster? Like download accelerator? – digz6666 Jan 10 '12 at 7:08
10  
If in.close throws an exception, fout.close is not called. – Beryllium Aug 9 '13 at 15:15
2  
How do I show the percentage downloaded – meain Apr 10 '14 at 16:54
    
@ComFreek That is simply untrue. Using a BufferedInputStream has precisely zero effect on socket timeouts. I had already refuted that as 'urban myth' in my comments to the 'background details' you cited. Three years earlier. – EJP Jul 23 '14 at 2:33
    
@EJP Thank you for the correction! I removed my comment (for the archive: I linked to this answer stating that BufferedInputStream "can cause unpredictable failures"). – ComFreek Jul 24 '14 at 15:53

Simpler nio usage:

URL website = new URL("http://www.website.com/information.asp");
try (InputStream in = website.openStream()) {
    Files.copy(in, target, StandardCopyOption.REPLACE_EXISTING);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much! – DmitryKanunnikoff Jun 11 '14 at 21:20
5  
Great way! I'd still put the .openStream() in a try-with-resources block. – Emmanuel Touzery Apr 14 '15 at 11:50
1  
Even though the InputStream of the URL never gets closed, this should be the accepted answer. (See comment of @EmmanuelTouzery). Files.copy(in, path) is by far the simplest way to this. – r0estir0bbe Oct 23 '15 at 9:50
2  
Despite the fact this is an elegant solution, behind the scenes this approach could silently betray you. Files.copy( InputStream, Paths, FileOption) delegates the copy process to the Files.copy( InputStream, OutputStream ). This last method does not check for the end of stream (-1) but checks for no byte read (0). It means that, if your network had a little pause, it could read 0 bytes and end the copy process, even if the stream isn't finished to be downloaded by the OS. – Miere Apr 13 at 13:17
1  
@Miere It is impossible for InputStream.read() to return zero unless you provided a zero length buffer or count, 'little pause' or otherwise. It will block until at least one byte has been transferred or end of stream or an error occurs. Your claim about the internals of Files.copy() is baseless. – EJP Jul 5 at 9:26

Downloading a file requires you to read it, either way you will have to go through the file in some way. Instead of line by line, you can just read it by bytes from the stream:

BufferedInputStream in = new BufferedInputStream(new URL("http://www.website.com/information.asp").openStream())
    byte data[] = new byte[1024];
    int count;
    while((count = in.read(data,0,1024)) != -1)
    {
        out.write(data, 0, count);
    }
share|improve this answer

When using Java 7+ use the following method to download a file from the Internet and save it to some directory:

public static Path download(String sourceUrl,
        String targetDirectory) throws MalformedURLException, IOException
{
    URL url = new URL(sourceUrl);

    String fileName = url.getFile();

    Path targetPath = new File(targetDirectory + fileName).toPath();

    Files.copy(url.openStream(), targetPath,
            StandardCopyOption.REPLACE_EXISTING);

    return targetPath;
}

http://docs.oracle.com/javase/7/docs/api/java/nio/file/Files.html

share|improve this answer
import java.io.*;
import java.net.*;

public class filedown {
    public static void download(String address, String localFileName) {
        OutputStream out = null;
        URLConnection conn = null;
        InputStream in = null;

        try {
            URL url = new URL(address);
            out = new BufferedOutputStream(new FileOutputStream(localFileName));
            conn = url.openConnection();
            in = conn.getInputStream();
            byte[] buffer = new byte[1024];

            int numRead;
            long numWritten = 0;

            while ((numRead = in.read(buffer)) != -1) {
                out.write(buffer, 0, numRead);
                numWritten += numRead;
            }

            System.out.println(localFileName + "\t" + numWritten);
        } 
        catch (Exception exception) { 
            exception.printStackTrace();
        } 
        finally {
            try {
                if (in != null) {
                    in.close();
                }
                if (out != null) {
                    out.close();
                }
            } 
            catch (IOException ioe) {
            }
        }
    }

    public static void download(String address) {
        int lastSlashIndex = address.lastIndexOf('/');
        if (lastSlashIndex >= 0 &&
        lastSlashIndex < address.length() - 1) {
            download(address, address.substring(lastSlashIndex + 1));
        } 
        else {
            System.err.println("Could not figure out local file name for "+address);
        }
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        for (int i = 0; i < args.length; i++) {
            download(args[i]);
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
3  
If in.close throws an exception, out.close is not called. – Beryllium Aug 9 '13 at 15:17

This answer is almost exactly like selected answer but with two enhancements: it's a method and it closes out the FileOutputStream object:

    public static void downloadFileFromURL(String urlString, File destination) {    
        try {
            URL website = new URL(urlString);
            ReadableByteChannel rbc;
            rbc = Channels.newChannel(website.openStream());
            FileOutputStream fos = new FileOutputStream(destination);
            fos.getChannel().transferFrom(rbc, 0, Long.MAX_VALUE);
            fos.close();
            rbc.close();
        } catch (IOException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }
share|improve this answer
3  
You should close the rbc as well. – Manuel May 27 '15 at 13:43
    
Thanks, Manuel! Done. – Brian Risk May 28 '15 at 14:37
    
A single call isn't adequate. transferFrom() isnt' specified to complete the entire transfer in a single call. That's why it returns a count. You have to loop. – EJP Jul 5 at 9:30

Personally, I've found Apache's HttpClient to be more than capable of everything I've needed to do with regards to this. Here is a great tutorial on using HttpClient

share|improve this answer
2  
also commons-io is a great library – dfa May 28 '09 at 15:32

This is another java7 variant based on Brian Risk's answer with usage of try-with statement:

public static void downloadFileFromURL(String urlString, File destination) throws Throwable {

      URL website = new URL(urlString);
      try(
              ReadableByteChannel rbc = Channels.newChannel(website.openStream());
              FileOutputStream fos = new FileOutputStream(destination);  
              ){
          fos.getChannel().transferFrom(rbc, 0, Long.MAX_VALUE);
      }

  }
share|improve this answer
    
A single call isn't adequate. transferFrom() isnt' specified to complete the entire transfer in a single call. That's why it returns a count. You have to loop. – EJP Jul 5 at 9:30
    
@EJP, you really think that it's better to download file with size bigger then 8388605 Terabytes rather than throw an exception? – msangel Jul 5 at 11:21

There is an issue with simple usage of:

org.apache.commons.io.FileUtils.copyURLToFile(URL, File) 

if you need to download and save very large files, or in general if you need automatic retries in case connection is dropped.

What I suggest in such cases is Apache HttpClient along with org.apache.commons.io.FileUtils. For example:

GetMethod method = new GetMethod(resource_url);
try {
    int statusCode = client.executeMethod(method);
    if (statusCode != HttpStatus.SC_OK) {
        logger.error("Get method failed: " + method.getStatusLine());
    }       
    org.apache.commons.io.FileUtils.copyInputStreamToFile(
        method.getResponseBodyAsStream(), new File(resource_file));
    } catch (HttpException e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
    } catch (IOException e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
    } finally {
    method.releaseConnection();
}
share|improve this answer

It's possible to download the file with with Apache's HttpComponents instead of Commons-IO. This code allows you to download a file in Java according to its URL and save it at the specific destination.

public static boolean saveFile(URL fileURL, String fileSavePath) {

    boolean isSucceed = true;

    CloseableHttpClient httpClient = HttpClients.createDefault();

    HttpGet httpGet = new HttpGet(fileURL.toString());
    httpGet.addHeader("User-Agent", "Mozilla/5.0 (Windows NT 6.3; WOW64; rv:34.0) Gecko/20100101 Firefox/34.0");
    httpGet.addHeader("Referer", "https://www.google.com");

    try {
        CloseableHttpResponse httpResponse = httpClient.execute(httpGet);
        HttpEntity fileEntity = httpResponse.getEntity();

        if (fileEntity != null) {
            FileUtils.copyInputStreamToFile(fileEntity.getContent(), new File(fileSavePath));
        }

    } catch (IOException e) {
        isSucceed = false;
    }

    httpGet.releaseConnection();

    return isSucceed;
}

In contrast to the single line of code:

FileUtils.copyURLToFile(fileURL, new File(fileSavePath),
                        URLS_FETCH_TIMEOUT, URLS_FETCH_TIMEOUT);

this code will give you more control over a process and let you specify not only time outs but User-Agent and Referer values, which are critical for many web-sites.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.