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I've tried searching through search engines,MSDN,etc. but can't anything. Sorry if this has been asked before. Is there any performance difference between using the T-SQL "Between" keyword or using comparison operators?

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6 Answers 6

up vote 20 down vote accepted

You can check this easily enough by checking the query plans in both situations. There is no difference of which I am aware. There is a logical difference though between BETWEEN and "<" and ">"... BETWEEN is inclusive. It's equivalent to "<=" and "=>".

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Good point. A subtlety I hadn't noticed. –  Nick DeVore May 28 '09 at 14:59

The query engine converts between into >= and <= (take a look at the query plan) so in practise they're identical and in theory >= <= is faster because the engine won't have to translate. Good luck noticing a difference though.

I use between anyway, I find it reads easier

Very complex queries/nested views with numerous between comparisons might benefit from changing into >= <= as this might potentially prevent optimisation timeouts by reducing the time spent on refactoring the query (just a theory, untested by me & I've never noticed it)

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The two operators that are being compared to one another here are fundamentally different and hence why the execution plans that are generated are also likely to be different (although not guaranteed).

The determining factor is the data distribution (selectivity) of the column that the comparison operators are applied to. This along with Statistics will dictate whether or not an index is or is not used etc.

Hope this makes sense.

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Not sure exactly why this was voted down. Did John say something that was wrong? Someone not feeling very good? Anyone have any ideas? –  wcm May 28 '09 at 15:40
    
I never altered the original question. I also didn't down vote. –  James Alexander May 28 '09 at 16:07
    
this answer makes sense to me...so this down vote is strange –  Michael Jun 20 '10 at 12:04

Love when folks give code to do your own testing, you need to do a larger subset / repeated test to account for indexes being loaded into memory, etc... before jumping to conclusions though. Here is the same code with a larger table and 10 iterations

DECLARE
    @Startdatetime datetime ,
    @Diff int = 0 ,
    @Addrowcount int = 1000 ,
    @ptr int = 1;


SET NOCOUNT ON;

--Create a tempory table to perform our tests on
DROP TABLE dbo.perftest

CREATE TABLE dbo.perftest( id int NOT NULL
                                       IDENTITY(1 , 1)
                                       PRIMARY KEY ,
                           mytext nvarchar( 50 )NOT NULL );

--Now add some sample rows

SET @Addrowcount = 20000;

WHILE(@Addrowcount > 0)

    BEGIN

        INSERT INTO dbo.perftest( mytext )
        VALUES( 'thetext' );

        SET @Addrowcount = @Addrowcount - 1;

    END;

WHILE @ptr < 10 -- do this a few times to account for indexes being loaded into memory

BEGIN

    SELECT @Startdatetime = GETDATE();

    -- do method 1 here

    SELECT mytext
      FROM dbo.perftest
      WHERE(id >= (100 + (@ptr * 1000)))
       AND (id <= (500 + (@ptr * 1000)));

    --end method1

    SELECT @Diff = DATEDIFF( millisecond , @Startdatetime , GETDATE());

    PRINT ':Method 1: ' + CAST(@Diff AS nvarchar( 20 )) + ' ms';

    --reset start time

    SELECT @Startdatetime = GETDATE();

    --do method2 here

    SELECT mytext
      FROM dbo.perftest
      WHERE id BETWEEN (300 + (@ptr * 1000))
        AND (800 + (@ptr * 1000));

    --end method2

    SELECT @Diff = DATEDIFF( millisecond , @Startdatetime , GETDATE());

    PRINT ':Method 2: ' + CAST(@Diff AS nvarchar( 20 )) + ' ms';

    SET @ptr = @ptr + 1

END

Gives you a very different set of results:

--Method 1    -- 10 ms
--Method 2    -- 33 ms
--Method 1    -- 40 ms
--Method 2    -- 26 ms
--Method 1    -- 23 ms
--Method 2    -- 23 ms
--Method 1    -- 13 ms
--Method 2    -- 16 ms
--Method 1    -- 13 ms
--Method 2    -- 20 ms
--Method 1    -- 6 ms
--Method 2    -- 16 ms
--Method 1    -- 26 ms
--Method 2    -- 16 ms
--Method 1    -- 13 ms
--Method 2    -- 13 ms
--Method 1    -- 16 ms
--Method 2    -- 13 ms

I would say from this (still pretty unscientific) test, not much difference either way.

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actually. I just try verifying between with some of my data. BETWEEN is equivalent to ">=" and "<". For example: Between '05/01/2010' and '05/30/2010': You will only get data between 5/1/2010 00:00:00 to 5/29/2010 23:59:59. Try query your table with "Order by [TimeField] desc" and you will see the result.

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3  
No this is incorrect. Are you sure you have data that is exactly 5/30/2010 00:00:00.000 to the millisecond? –  Martin Smith Jul 9 '10 at 22:17
    
This contradicts documentation, which means if this is true it is a bug. I tend to agree with Mr. Smith that the data is probably wrong. –  Mark Williams Nov 6 '13 at 14:48

I was also interested in whether there is a performance difference when I used (>= and <=) compared to using the between keyword. (I come from a dotnet background and like the >= style operators).
Here is the script I used:

DECLARE
    @Startdatetime datetime ,
    @Diff int = 0 ,
    @Addrowcount int = 1000;

SET NOCOUNT ON;

--Create a tempory table to perform our tests on

CREATE TABLE dbo.perftest( id smallint NOT NULL
                                       IDENTITY(1 , 1)
                                       PRIMARY KEY ,
                           mytext nvarchar( 50 )NOT NULL );

--Now add some sample rows

SET @Addrowcount = 1000;

WHILE(@Addrowcount > 0)

    BEGIN

        INSERT INTO dbo.perftest( mytext )
        VALUES( 'thetext' );

        SET @Addrowcount = @Addrowcount - 1;

    END;

SELECT @Startdatetime = GETDATE();

-- do method 1 here

SELECT mytext
  FROM dbo.perftest
  WHERE(id >= 100)
   AND (id <= 900);

--end method1

SELECT @Diff = DATEDIFF( millisecond , @Startdatetime , GETDATE());

PRINT ':Method 1: ' + CAST(@Diff AS nvarchar( 20 )) + ' ms';

--reset start time

SELECT @Startdatetime = GETDATE();

--do method2 here

SELECT mytext
  FROM dbo.perftest
  WHERE id BETWEEN 100
    AND 900;

--end method2

SELECT @Diff = DATEDIFF( millisecond , @Startdatetime , GETDATE());

PRINT ':Method 2: ' + CAST(@Diff AS nvarchar( 20 )) + ' ms';

The results were:

Method 1: 140 ms

Method 2: 70 ms

So it appears that performance is improved by using between.

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Not sure how valid a test like this is... I guess as valid as any simple profile test, but that isn't saying much. Can be a lot different based on caching (you just added the records) and also nothing else going on at the time (unlike a real world server), and all records being added at the same time, vs being fragmented over several pages/time. –  eselk Apr 18 '13 at 0:22

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